The United States after the World War

By James C. Malin | Go to book overview
Russians and with the government. Loans to finance exports from Germany to Russia were disapproved in 1926. In 1928 an issue of Russian railroad bonds was being offered privately to American investors, and three American financial institutions were acting as agents for payment of interest and retirement charges. American holders of pre-war Russian bonds protested to the Department of State. An investigation was made, and the bonds were disapproved, February 1, 1928, since they were secured by the same railroads as the Czarist bonds which the Soviet government had repudiated. The American banks then withdrew from the arrangement. The announcement of the Department of State went farther than this particular issue. It stated that "the department does not view with favor financial arrangements designed to facilitate in any way the sale of Soviet bonds in the United States."The French-loan episode was the occasion of a formal attack on the loan policy of the government by Senator Glass of Virginia, formerly Secretary of the Treasury. His statement ( October 14, 1927) held that the practice of scrutinizing loans was without constitutional or statutory authority and, besides, was an improper exercise of powers which might lead to national scandal. Senator Borah was quoted as saying that while he did not wish to criticize the Department of State he thought it was a practice which should be terminated. The attack had no appreciable effect on the President, who, on the same day, indicated that there would be no change in the practice.
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
PHELPS C. W. The Foreign Expansion of American Banks. The Ronald Press Company, 1927.
SPEAKER L. M. The Investment Trust. A. W. Shaw Company, 1924.
FOWLER JOHN F. American Investment Trusts. Harper & Brothers, 1928.
DUNN R. W. American Foreign Investments. The Viking Press, 1926.
WILLIAMS B. H. Economic Foreign Policy of the United States. McGraw- Hill Book Company, 1929.

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