CHAPTER VIII

UNTIL November 9, 1841 no male heir had been born to the Sovereign since the birth of George IV in 1762, and there were weighty points of procedure to be settled now which had not arisen then. Little Albert Edward was Earl of Chester from the moment he first drew breath, and within a month his mother created him Prince of Wales, but a heraldic battle raged over his Arms. His father had the right to the Arms of a Duke of Saxony and wished that his son should bear them quartered with the Arms of England. Since Albert wished it, the Queen ordered that this should be done, but it was not quite so simple. The Earl Marshal had to instruct the Herald's College to see that the coat was correct, and the Heralds strongly objected to the Royal Arms of England being quartered with those of so insignificant a realm: they pronounced it most derogatory to England. So the Queen with the same firmness as she had shewn in the Bedchamber Plot wrote to say that such was her command, and the Heralds on behalf of the nation had to swallow the insult. Then was the infant to be prayed for in church as "The Prince of Wales," or "His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales"? Again his father had to be considered: Albert, though a Royal Highness as well as his son, was only prayed for as "Prince Albert." So, liturgically, "The Prince of Wales," was settled on as being a sufficient identification for purposes of orison.

-117-

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  • Title Page *
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Note *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 32
  • Chapter IV 49
  • Chapter V 66
  • Chapter VI 74
  • Chapter VII 97
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter IX 142
  • Chapter X 158
  • Chapter XI 168
  • Chapter XII 186
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  • Chapter XV 239
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