CHAPTER XVI

GLADSTONE fully realised the fresh start that the Prince of Wales's illness had given him, and that he should now be employed at some post that would give him occupation and curtail his exuberant leisure was most important for the stabilization of the Throne. He resumed the discussion he had held with the Queen, which she had promised to think over, about his being ap- -pointed non-political Viceroy in Ireland, and sent her a portentous memorandum of about 3500 words, far the longest communication, it may safely be stated, that any Prime Minister had ever submitted to her. As preamble he suggested that the Prince should be furnished with des- -patches from the Foreign Office, which might rouse his interest in international relations; or he might be associated with the India Office. But such employment would be only sporadic, and something more solid was required. He filled in with a profusion of detail the scheme already outlined. It comprised the abolition of the Viceroy, whose tenure was political, and the appointment of the non-political heir to the Throne, with a Minister for Ireland, having a seat in the Cabinet. This office, thought Gladstone, would vastly increase the Prince's moral and social influence in London, and since he would reside in Ireland only during the winter months, he and his peerless wife could be in London to relieve his mother of those Court ceremonial duties in the summer, which, as she had repeatedly said, her health and

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Queen Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Note *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 32
  • Chapter IV 49
  • Chapter V 66
  • Chapter VI 74
  • Chapter VII 97
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter IX 142
  • Chapter X 158
  • Chapter XI 168
  • Chapter XII 186
  • Chapter XIII 203
  • Chapter XIV 218
  • Chapter XV 239
  • Chapter XVI 263
  • Chapter XVII 277
  • Chapter XVIII 306
  • Chapter XIX 335
  • Chapter XX 357
  • Chapter XXI 383
  • Index 399
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