Continental Humanist Poetics: Studies in Erasmus, Castiglione, Marguerite de Navarre, Rabelais, and Cervantes

By Arthur F. Kinney | Go to book overview

THREE
Della mortal oblivione questa chiara memoria: Baldassare Castiglione, Il Libro del Cortegiano, and the Poetics of Eloquence

FIGURING FOLLY AS MAIEU- TIC NARRATOR IS ERASMUS'S REMARKABLY SUCCESSFUL WAY OF UTILIZING (AND EVEN EXPLOITING) HUMANIST RHETORIC BOTH TO ADMIT THE HIGHER POSSIBILITIES OF HUMANIST PHILOSO- phy and to confront the essential cognitive indeterminacy and textual instability that might result from a newly developing culture in which ideas are as much exploratory as declarative and words are acts of mediation rather than authoritative counters. Indeed, the very tentativeness of the Encomium Moriae, masked more or less by its self-delight in wordplay, suggests that Erasmus understood that humanist declamation, disputation, and treatise closely approach--may even at their basis be forms of--fiction. Both work as much from hypothesis as from thesis.

Such an understanding of the propositional quality of speech and debate, resting as it must on methexis, is shared by Baldassare Castiglione in Il Libro del Cortegiano. This extraordinary Italian humanist fiction of the sixteenth century vastly extends the voices, attitudes, and allusions of Erasmus's fiction by setting its rhetorical investigations within a highly cultivated social and political setting: Here prosopographia rather than prosopopoeia is elevated to a marmoreal art. Given the refinements of the civilization he means to portray, Castiglione fashions a fiction that is deliberately a work of elegance and eloquence. He eschews the troubled inconsistencies that Erasmus employs to characterize Folly, and that always threaten to undo the order and sense of Folly's presentation by distributing such conflicting views among the several disputants that

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Continental Humanist Poetics: Studies in Erasmus, Castiglione, Marguerite de Navarre, Rabelais, and Cervantes
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 367

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.