Power and Principle: Armed Intervention in Wilsonian Foreign Policy

By Frederick S. Calhoun | Go to book overview

2.
THE POWER of CIVILIAN CONTROL: Mexico

Woodrow Wilson came to power during the formative years of the age of experts. The Progressive movement in the United States, in which he took a leading part, encompassed a variety of reforms that reflected the increasing industrialization and specialization of American life. A vast expansion of information and detail inhered in the transformation from a rural to an industrial society, which resulted in a troubled unrest. The changes, in effect, opened the door to an infinite unknown. No longer could a single man study exhaustively many unrelated fields as Thomas Jefferson had done a century earlier, for knowledge had exceeded the limits of the individually knowable. This excess drove the Renaissance Man into extinction by compelling people to take satisfaction in the mastery of one subject. Men carved out niches for themselves, relying on experts in other areas to supply them with the information necessary to offset their unbalanced learning. To deal with the problems confronting them, these cohorts in ignorance turned to specialists from every field for solutions.

Wilson, for example, specialized in American history and government, but he relied on such men as Louis D. Brandeis, William G. McAdoo, Albert S. Burleson, and David F. Houston for advice and direction in those areas beyond his ken. If no experts were readily available, he enlisted aid from people willing to develop a specialty. Thus, Wilson sent William Bayard Hale and John Lind to investigate the Mexican Revolution; he dispatched John F. Fort and Charles C. Smith to Santo Domingo and Haiti to solve the problems racking those two countries; he assigned Colonel House and Robert Lansing to different aspects of World War I; and he employed William R. Bullitt

-34-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Power and Principle: Armed Intervention in Wilsonian Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 342

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.