The Deep South States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Seven Deep South States

By Neal R. Peirce | Go to book overview

ALABAMA
THE "CRADLE" GETS ROCKED
Alabama's Political Roots242
George Wallace: Compulsive Campaigner249
George Wallace: Populist or Not?258
Saints and Sinners: Alabamians in Washington261
People and Economy of a Blue-Collar State266
Cityscape: Huntsville and the North271
Notes on Montgomery, Mobile, and the University Towns276
Birmingham: In Metamorphosis282
Alabama Futures292

ALABAMA, whose capital city was the "Cradle of the Confederacy," could not have been expected to welcome the civil rights revolution of our time. The state had, to be sure, nurtured a number of progressive leaders over the years, and it was the home of one of the boldest defenders of constitutional rights ever to sit on the United States Supreme Court, justice Hugo L. Black. It was in Alabama that Martin Luther King, Jr., and Ralph David Abernathy, and Andrew J. Young bad all bad their first churches. (All three, interestingly, married girls from a single Alabama county--Perry.) It was events in Alabama that would trigger the second American Reconstruction--the Reconstruction of the 1960s.

But official Alabama bad been dead set against all that. The Stars and Bars still flew over the gleaming white State Capitol at Montgomery, with the United States flag relegated to a shorter flagpole on the grounds. (Some Alabamians said it was a mistake to read too much symbolism into that, since the Confederate States had been organized in the building, making it a kind of historic shrine. However, the government of present-day--not Confederate-- Alabama was being administered from the building.) The words "White Supremacy--For the Right" adorned the ruling Democratic party's symbol on election day ballots. From their bitter reaction to the Montgomery bus boycott, to Bull Connor's police dogs in Birmingham, to the nightsticks and whips beating down on the bodies of the rights marchers by the bridge in Selma, white Alabamians showed their abhorrence for the changes sweeping

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The Deep South States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Seven Deep South States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • The Deep South States "Free at Last"? 13
  • Louisiana an Evocation 46
  • Arkansas Up from Provincialism 123
  • Mississippi - HOPE AT LAST 162
  • Alabama the "Cradle" Gets Rocked 235
  • Georgia Empire State of the South 306
  • South Carolina - FOSSIL NO MORE 380
  • Florida the Man-Made State 435
  • Acknowledgments 495
  • Bibliography 500
  • Index 515
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