The Deep South States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Seven Deep South States

By Neal R. Peirce | Go to book overview

SOUTH CAROLINA

FOSSIL NO MORE
The Heritage Forms 382 Innovations: Educational TV,
The Bleak Middle Years 387 Computerized Registration 415
Palmetto Politics: Democrats and the The Economy: Textiles Plus 416
Race Issue 391 Notes on the Environment, Hilton
. . . and Now the Republicans 397 Head Opulence, and Rural
South Carolinians and National Destitution 423
Power 402 Piedmont and the Midlands 426
State Government: Farewell to the Charleston: Motherstone of the South 428
"Barnwell Ring" 410

SHOULD ANYONE DOUBT that the historic experience of an American state can shape and direct its existence, even in these days of cultural homogenization the case of South Carolina proves the point. The roots go deep here. In spirit, in culture, and in finance, South Carolina was the center of the South when Mississippi was still Indian territory. In the 19th century, South Carolina leaders virtually created the South as a self-conscious region, and they led it out of the Union. Bleak years of poverty and pervasive Confederate nostalgia and general intellectual stagnation came between the Civil War and World War II. It was then that South Carolina truly was a "fossilized" society. But in the 1960s it was South Carolina that showed the South the way toward racial integration with dignity.

So it is that from the peculiarly aristocratic nature of the early planter class and the intellectual life of old Charles Town, to the era of John C. Calhoun and professed paternalistic care for slaves, to Fort Sumter and Reconstruction and the upcountry textile culture and the unique political roles of men like James F. Byrnes and J. Strom Thurmond and Ernest F. Hollings, the themes of a unique civilization come ringing down the corridors of history. Violence there has been too, from the bloody suppression of early slave rebellions to countless lynchings in the middle years to the massacre at

-380-

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The Deep South States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Seven Deep South States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • The Deep South States "Free at Last"? 13
  • Louisiana an Evocation 46
  • Arkansas Up from Provincialism 123
  • Mississippi - HOPE AT LAST 162
  • Alabama the "Cradle" Gets Rocked 235
  • Georgia Empire State of the South 306
  • South Carolina - FOSSIL NO MORE 380
  • Florida the Man-Made State 435
  • Acknowledgments 495
  • Bibliography 500
  • Index 515
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