The Deep South States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Seven Deep South States

By Neal R. Peirce | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
THESE BOOKS HAD TO BE, by their very character, a personal odyssey and personal task. But they would never have been possible without the kind assistance of hundreds of people. First there were those who encouraged me to go forward when the idea was first conceived: my wife Barbara (little imagining the long curtailments of family life that would ensue, and whose encouragement was vital throughout); my parents and other relatives; my editor, Evan W. Thomas, vice president and editor of W. W. Norton & Co.; John Gunther; my agent, Sterling Lord, and his assistant at that time, Jonathan Walton; Richard Kluger, Bernard Haldane, Roan Conrad, Joseph Foote, and William B. Dickinson; Richard M., Scammon, director of the Elections Research Center and coauthor of The Real Majority; and D. B. Hardeman, professor of political science and biographer of the late House Speaker Sam Rayburn. A fellowship at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars provided intellectual and physical sustenance.My very warmest thanks go to those who read the draft manuscript in its entirety: Evan W. Thomas; Russell L. Bradley; Jean Allaway; Frederick H. Sontag, public relations consultant of South Orange, N.J.; and copy editor Calvin Towle at W. W. Norton & Company. In addition, each of the state chapters was submitted to several persons living in, and having extensive knowledge of, the state in question. The returning corrections and amendments were immensely helpful. The names of those readers appear in the longer list of names below; I choose not to list them here lest someone hold them responsible for something said or unsaid in one of the chapters, and of course the full responsibility for that lies with me.Various friends and associates helped with many of the details of research, and for that I am especially indebted to Thomas Ward, Judith Kolberg, Oliver Cromwell, Geneva Torrey, Barbara Hurlbutt, Prentice and Alice Bowsher, Anne Gault, and DeMar and Claudia Teuscher. And without the cheery and efficient services of my typist, Merciel Dixon, the manuscript would never have seen the light of day at all., Rose Franco of W. W. Norton helped in innumerable ways; I am indebted to designer Marjorie Flock and production manager Andy Marasia of Norton; and credit goes to Russell Lenz, former chief cartographer of the Christian Science Monitor, for what I feel is the superb job he did on the state and city maps.Across the country, people gave generously of their time to brief me on the developments of the past several years in their states and cities. I am listing those from the seven Deep South States below, together with many people who helped with national and interstate themes. The names of some officials are included whom I had interviewed in the year or two prior to beginning work on this project, when the background from those interviews proved helpful with this book. To all, my sincerest thanks.
PERSONS INTERVIEWED
Affiliations of interviewees are as of time of author's interview with them.
AINSWORTH, Robert A., Federal Judge, New Orleans, La.
ALLBRIGHT, Charles, Winthrop Rockefeller & Associates, Little Rock, Ark.
ALLEN, Ivan, Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia
AMRINE, Michael, Former Aide to Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller of Arkansas, Washington, D.C.
ASHDOWN, Sam, Special Assistant to Lt. Gov. Tom Adams ( Fla.)

-495-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Deep South States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Seven Deep South States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • The Deep South States "Free at Last"? 13
  • Louisiana an Evocation 46
  • Arkansas Up from Provincialism 123
  • Mississippi - HOPE AT LAST 162
  • Alabama the "Cradle" Gets Rocked 235
  • Georgia Empire State of the South 306
  • South Carolina - FOSSIL NO MORE 380
  • Florida the Man-Made State 435
  • Acknowledgments 495
  • Bibliography 500
  • Index 515
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 528

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.