Nativism and Slavery: The Northern Know Nothings and the Politics of the 1850's

By Tyler Anbinder | Go to book overview

Bibliography

This bibliography does not list every source utilized in the preparation of this book. Instead, I have listed those works that I relied upon most heavily for information, or that influenced my conception of Civil War-era politics and culture. Those who wish to examine a more extensive list, especially of anti-Catholic literature and Master's theses, should consult my doctoral dissertation, "Nativism and Politics: The Know Nothing Party in the Northern United States" ( Columbia University, 1990).


KNOW NOTHING RECORDS

American Party Ritual. Rare Book Room, University of Rochester.

Constitution and By-laws of the Order. Adopted, May, 1855. Indianapolis, 1855. Indiana State Library.

Constitution of the S.C. of the State of Connecticut. Adopted Sept. 7, 1854. Hartford, 1854. Connecticut State Library.

Constitutions of the State and Subordinate Councils of Wisconsin. Milwaukee, 1855. State Historical Society of Wisconsin.

Ethan Allen Council [Canandaigua, New York] Minute Book. Ontario County Historical Society.

Know Nothing Party [?] Membership List, Maine Historical Society.

Rituals of the First and Second Degrees. [n.p., n.d.]. State Historical Society of Wisconsin.

Sub-Council 5 [East Boston] Minute Book. Solomon B. Morse, Jr., Papers. Massachusetts Historical Society.

Sub-Council 23 [ Worcester, Massachusetts] Membership List and Scrapbook. Worcester Historical Museum.

Sub-Council 49 [ Worcester] Minute Book. American Antiquarian Society.


RECORDS OF OTHER NATIVIST ORGANIZATIONS

Guard of Liberty [ Harrisburg] Minute Book. Pennsylvania State Archives. Order of United Americans Scrapbook, New York Public Library.


MANUSCRIPTS

Adams Family Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society

Archdiocesan Records, University of Notre Dame Archives

Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr. Papers, Library of Congress

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