The Sources of Russian Foreign Policy after the Cold War

By Celeste A. Wallander | Go to book overview

About the Editor and Contributors

Matthew Evangelista is the author of Innovation and the Arms Race: How the United States and the Soviet Union Develop New Military Technologies ( 1988) and numerous articles in journals such as International Security, World Politics, and International Organization. He spent 1993-1995 as a visiting scholar at Harvard's Center for Science and International Affairs and plans to join the faculty of Cornell University's Department of Government in autumn 1996.

Ted Hopf is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Michigan and a faculty associate of the Center for Russian and East European Studies there. He is the author of Peripheral Visions: Deterrence Theory and American Foreign Policy in the Third World, 1965-1990 ( 1994).

Bruce D. Porter is associate professor of political science at Brigham Young University. Prior to joining the BYU faculty in 1990, he was the Bradley Senior Research Associate of the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University. Dr. Porter also served previously as an analyst of Soviet foreign policy at Radio Free Europe in Munich, Germany; was a professional staff member of the Senate Armed Services Committee; and was executive director of the Board for International Broadcasting, the federal agency that oversees Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty. He is author of the recently published War and the Rise of the State: The Military Foundations of Modern Politics ( 1994).

James Richter is associate professor of political science at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. He is the author of Khrushchev's Double Bind: International Pressures and Domestic Coalition Politics ( 1994) and is now examining the links between international politics, national identity, and regional politics of Russia.

Jack Snyder is professor of political science and director of the Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University. He is the author of Myths of Empire: Domestic Politics and International Ambition ( 1991).

Astrid S. Tuminez is a program officer for the Program on Preventing Deadly Conflict at the Carnegie Corporation of New York. She is also a Ph.D. candidate in political science at MIT and is writing a dissertation on "Russian Nationalism: Content, Empowerment, and Impact on Foreign Policy, 1856-1994." She holds a master's degree in Soviet Studies from Harvard University and was formerly assistant director of the Harvard Project on Strengthening Democratic Institutions.

Celeste A. Wallander is associate professor of government and faculty associate at the Center for International Affairs and the Russian Research Center at Harvard University. She is author of "International Institutions and Modern Security Strategies," Problems of Communism ( 1992), and "Opportunity, Incrementalism, and Learning in the Extensionand Retraction of Soviet Global Commitments,"

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