Designs from Fancy: George Romney's Shakespearean Drawings

By Yvonne Romney Dixon | Go to book overview

Chronology of Romney's Life
1734December 26, born at Beckside near Dalton in Furness, Lancashire (December 15 in the Julian
calendar, used prior to 1752)
1755Apprenticed to Christopher Steele for four years
1756October 14, marries Mary Abbot, the daughter of his landlady
1757Leaves Steele after two years of working with the artist in York, Lancaster, and Kendal. Becomes his
own master. April 6, birth of his son, John Romney, who would become his father's biographer
1762Disposes of twenty paintings by lottery at the Kendal Town Hall. Departs for London on March 14
1763First exhibits at the Free Society of Artists, which awards him 25 guineas for his The Death of General
Wolfe. Continues to place works on exhibition at the Free Society until 1769
1764Leaves in September for six weeks in Paris in company with his friend Thomas Greene; meets
Joseph Vernet
1765Receives a 50 guinea award from the Free Society for his The Death of King Edmund. Visits family in
the North. Romney's wife had by this time left Kendal to live with and look after Romney's father at
Dalton. Spends much of his time while in the North painting portraits in Lancaster
1767Again visits family and paints portraits in the North
1769Exhibits for the last time at the Free Society
1770His first exhibit at the Society of Artists ( Mirth and Melancholy)
1772Exhibits two portraits at the Society of Artists; Romney's last participation in regular
public exhibitions

-16-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Designs from Fancy: George Romney's Shakespearean Drawings
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.