Out of the Shadows: Women and Politics in the French Revolution, 1789-95

By Shirley Elson Roessler | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
THE OCTOBER DAYS

Les hommes ont fait le 14 juillet, les femmes le 6 octobre. Les hommes ont pris la Bastille royale, et les femmes ont pris ta royauté elle-même. (The men made the 14 July; the women the 6 October. The men took the royal Bastille and the women took royalty itself.) Jules Michelet, Les Femmes de la révolution.


FROM PARIS TO VERSAILLES

Women played no role in the fiscal and political crises that led to the convocation of the Estates-General in 1789. However, they soon began to participate in some of the most significant events of that first year of the Revolution. Working women had sensed for some time that their traditional rights and roles were gradually being eroded by state intervention. Their traditional rights within the guilds and their participation in religious and secular ceremonies were, they felt, increasingly the object of such intervention. The feeling of loss of control in their daily lives resulted in the formulation of petitions by groups of women in which they expressed grievances; the famous Cahiers des doléances (Notebooks of grievances) taken early in 1789 testified to the growing discontent of the working class women of Paris. The flower-sellers, the laundresses, even the unhappily married women, had their say in the Cahiers.1 At the same time, women were experiencing increasing difficulty in obtaining enough food to feed their families. Wages were low and bread was scarce and in April a few women registered their discontent with the situation by participating in the Réveillon Riots in Paris. Even at this early stage a political theme surfaced along with the economic issues. A woman, Marie-Jeanne Trumeau,

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Out of the Shadows: Women and Politics in the French Revolution, 1789-95
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vii
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The October Days 7
  • Chapter 2 - Women and Revolutionary Politics 49
  • Chapter 3 - La Societe Des Citoyennes Republicaines Revolutionnaires 101
  • Chapter 4 - The Year III 163
  • Conclusion 195
  • Appendix - Declaration Des Droits De La Femme Et De La Citoyenne 201
  • Bibliography 245
  • Index 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 278

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.