Fundamental Problems of Marxism

By George V. Plekhanov | Go to book overview

EDITOR'S NOTES

Fundamental Problems of Marxism
The reference is to the school of philosophy that arose in Asia Minor in the sixth century B.C. and adhered to a naive materialism and dialectic. Philosophers of this school held that various kinds of matter formed the foundation of the universe. Thus, Thales considered water to be that foundation, Anaximenes--air, and Heraclitus--fire, etc. The various phenomena of Nature were the result of changes or modifications of that underlying substance.
Hylozoism--the philosophical doctrine that attributes to matter a species of life or sensation, and draws no distinction between living and non-living matter.
The copy of this book preserved in Plekhanov's library has the following marginal remark, in Plekhanov's hand, standing against the quotation from Adler: "Adler has forgotten this." This memorial volume contained Engels' earliest economic work, "Outlines of a Critique of Political Economy," which was first published in 1844. An English translation is to be found in the Appendix to Karl Marx, The Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, Dirk J. Struik , ed., New York, 1964.
Modernism--a trend in Roman Catholic theology at the close of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries. It comprised a system of views aimed at reconciling Catholic tenets and contemporary science. In September 1907 this trend was condemned in an encyclical issued by Pope Pius X.

Plekhanov's words regarding the probability of attempts to "supplement Marx" by Thomas Aquinas have proved prophetic. The Neo-Thomists have often made such attempts. For example, Marcel Reding, in his book St. Thomas Aquinas and Karl Marx, published in 1953, attempted to show that both Karl Marx and Thomas Aquinas had one and the same teacher, Aristotle, and that there is much in common in their philosophical views. He sees this common feature in "the struggle for the rehabilitation . . . of the material world," in the emphasis laid on the subordination of the particular to the general, and so on.

The English editions of the works referred to are: Frederick Engels, Anti-Dühring, New York, 1939; Ludwig Feuerbach, New York, 1941, also in Marx and Engels, Selected Works (in one volume), New York, 1968; for Plekhanov's preface and notes to the latter work, see his Selected Philosophical Works (English edition), Moscow, I, 484-538; Engels, Socialism Utopian and Scientific, New York, 1935, also in Marx- Engels Selected Works; Marx, Capital, New York, 1967; Marx, The Poverty of Philosophy, New York, 1963.
The full title of the first three volumes of this publication is: Aus dem literatischen Nachlass von Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels und Ferdinand Lassalle, Hrsg. von Franz Mehring , Stuttgart, 1902, Bd. I, II, III. Gesammelte Schriften von Karl Marx und Friedrich Engels von März 1841 bis Oktober 1850.
Marx's doctor's dissertation can be found in English translation in Norman D. Livergood , Activity in Marx's Philosophy, The Hague, 1967, Appendix.

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fundamental Problems of Marxism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • EDITOR'S NOTE 6
  • EDITOR'S PREFACE 7
  • I- Philosophical Writings of Marx and Engels 23
  • Ii. Feuerbach and Marx 27
  • Iii. Thinking and Being in Feuerbach 34
  • Iv. Emergence of Historical Materialism 40
  • V. the Materialist Dialectic as Method 44
  • Vi. Productive Forces and Geography 49
  • Vii. Role of Relations of Production 53
  • Viii. Base and Culture 58
  • Ix. Interaction of Base and Superstructure 63
  • X. Man and Necessity in History 67
  • Xi. Economic Base and Ideology 71
  • Xii. Against One-Sidedness and Schematism 74
  • Xiii. Psychology of the Epoch 81
  • Xiv. Class Struggle and Ideas 84
  • Xv. Necessity and Freedom 88
  • Xvi. Necessity and Revolution 94
  • EDITOR'S NOTES 179
  • BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES AND INDEX 185
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.