The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2

By Domingo Fernández Navarrete; J. S. Cummins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
MY DEPARTURE FROM CANTON TO MACAO

1. The Fathers of the Society very well knew my Intention to go out of Canton, because I had made it known upon several occasions, and had writ about it to their Father Visitor, Luis de Gama, who was at Macao, giving him sufficient Reasons for my going to see him.1 This my Resolution being known, the Fathers consulted whether my going away might be prejudicial or hurtful to them, as Father Lubeli told me. They and I both knew it would not, rather it was a gain to them, for they brought in another of their own Fathers in my place as I was afterwards inform'd, and I had my self urg'd before. What made me most eager to be gone was, that the Jesuit Father Intorceta had left for Rome the Year before, after the Disputations we had held; and there being many Points discussed in which I and others could not agree, I was troubled that I also could not go to Manila to confer with my own Superiors; for to manage this Business by Letter would be never-ending. On my Way I also design'd to discourse with the Jesuit Visitor upon the same Subject, and to propose a compromise about some of the Matters betwixt us. Frier Antony of St Mary, a Franciscan, desir'd the same. But afterwards at Macao I cool'd in this Design, on account of some Tales and Stories that I heard there.

Having consider'd the Business, which was not easy to carry out, tho there was no difficulty in beginning it, and having communicated my Design to Persons of undoubted Reputation, I set about my Aim and I made use of a Christian Chinese Merchant who was a not very considerable Person. The time being fix'd and

____________________
1
The 'Visitor' is a general superior over a whole area; for this much criticized departure from the Canton detention, see Appendix I below.

-250-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 476

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.