The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2

By Domingo Fernández Navarrete; J. S. Cummins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVII
OF THE CITY MACAO, ITS SITUATION, STRENGTH, AND OTHER PARTICULARS

1. I have hitherto observ'd, and will for the future, what the Holy Ghost says, 'Let a true word go before thee in all works' ( Eccles. 37, ch. 20), wherefore no Man need make a doubt of what I write, but ought rather to give entire credit to it. Cajetan says, 'For it is most reasonable, that all credit be given to those who have not only seen, but whose duty it is to testify to others what they have seen.' As I am a Religious, Priest, Apostolical Missioner and Preacher, tho unworthy in all respects, what I relate deserves and ought to be look'd upon as undoubted truth, especially in regard I am an eye-witness.

2. The Chineses from all antiquity had prohibited the admitting of Strangers into their Kingdom and Trading with them, tho for some years, Covetousness prevailing, they have sail'd to Japan, Manila, Siam, and other parts within the Straits of Sincapura, and of Governador in the Sea of Malaca, as I have observ'd before: but all this has always been an infringement of their antient Law, the Mandarines of the Coast conniving at it for their private gain.1 This is the reason why when the Portugueses began to sail those Seas and to trade with China they had no safe Port there nor any way to secure one. They were some years in the Island Xan Choang, where St Francis Xaverius dy'd; some years they went to the Province of Fo Kien, another while to the City Ning Po in the Province of Che Kiang, whence they were

____________________
1
Many of the troubles between Macao and Peking were the result of scheming and self-interest on the part of the mandarins at Canton, who made a handsome profit out of the official trade-post at Macao; other trading, e.g. with Japan and Java, was carried on by Fukienese smugglers. It is this last that Navarrete accuses the mandarins of conniving at.

-260-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 476

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.