The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2

By Domingo Fernández Navarrete; J. S. Cummins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVIII
MY VOYAGE TO MALACA, AND STAY THERE

1. The Captain and Pilot of the Ship's name was Stephen Diaz, a Man in great repute at Macao, but he lost much of it this Voyage. There are many ill-grounded Opinions; because four or five say 'such a Man is an able Pilot, or good Soldier,' they presently applaud him as such, and when occasion offers he appears to be a mere Ignoramus. Certain it is, he was an honest Man and good Christian; so that doubtless God favours him, which is Knowledg and good Fortune enough. He never swore nor curs'd, a thing rare enough in an European and Portuguese Sailor. When angry he would say, 'I vow my Soul to God.' He pray'd incessantly, his Rosary Beads were never out of his hands, and he delighted in hearing talk of Spiritual things. He offer'd me all he had aboard; I stood not in need of it, but was thankful for his good Will, and did him all the Service I could. When the Tartars oppress'd Macao, he put to Sea; and to save his Ship and Mens Lives, he went to Manila, which Port he put into upon the security of a Pass he had from the Governor Don James Salcedo [ 1663-8 ]; who did not observe it, but took his Ship. All Men disapprov'd of this Action, and when that Governor was seiz'd, he that succeeded him [Peña Bonifaz], restor'd the Ship to the right Owner, and he return'd in it to Macao in August 1669. I had good accommodation given me in the great Cabin, where there were some other Passengers who all were extremely kind to me. The first night he steerd East, and then tack'd and stood away to the South, thinking he had left the Flats of Pulisisi [Pulo-Cecir] astern (they are famous in that Sea, and extend below Camboxa) here it was he began to lose the Reputation of being an able Seaman. A great Pilot who went aboard as a

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