The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2

By Domingo Fernández Navarrete; J. S. Cummins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
MY JOURNEY TO GOLCONDA

1. When we arriv'd at Madrastapatan, our Pilot said he would make a Voyage to Tenaseri [Tenasserim], or some other place before going to Goa, to make amends for the great Expence he had been at; his Resolution was dislik'd. For this reason, and to avoid the Sea which had quite tir'd me, I resolv'd to go to Goa by Land: They gave me such a description of the Road, that it would have put any Man into the mind of seeing it, tho he had never so little mind to travel. I sold some Rags at a poor rate, left some Books and Papers with my Friends, borrow'd eight Pieces of Eight to be paid in Goa. I went to the English Governor, rather to beg an Alms, than to take my leave; told him my Want and Design, he immediately with much courtesy gave me five Pagodas of Gold, which amount to little less than ten Pieces of Eight.1 A Native of Canara gave me two, so I thought I had enough for my Journey. The day before I set out, I took more notice than I had done before of the practice of the European Factors in those Parts; they are all serv'd by the Natives, who are most faithful, submissive, and punctual in doing what they are commanded. Some Factors have above 100 Servants; they are very chargeable for every one has a Piece of Eight and half, or two Pieces of Eight wages a Month; all these come together in the Evening to bid good night to the Factor, Governor, or Commander, and take their leave to go to their own Homes to bed. They rank themselves over against the Fort; some have lighted Torches in their hands, others beat Kettle-drums, others sound Trumpets, others play on Fifes, the rest beat their Spears and Bucklers together for above a quarter of an hour. After this a great

____________________
1
This was George Foxcroft, Governor until his departure for England in January 1672. For the pagoda, see the article in Hobson-Jobson, and C. H. Philips (ed.), Handbook of Oriental History ( London, 1951), 62.

-305-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 476

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.