The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2

By Domingo Fernández Navarrete; J. S. Cummins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXV
MY STAY AT SOALI, AND SETTING OUT AGAIN FOR FRANCE

1. I came to Soali much tir'd, and had a mind to stay at Suratte to wait for a Religious who design'd to travel by Land; but the next Day I had a Letter from him, giving me an account he had not been able to come by Land, by reason of Subagi's Army which lay in the way, he having already drawn near to Golconda, and destroy'd many Towns and Villages about that Court.1 This made me take another course, which was to make my Intention known to the Director General [ Caron ], who, tho a rank Heretick, had been civil to me, always gave me place at Table above others; drank to me first, and gave me the best Bit off his plate.2 At first he made some difficulty of giving me my Passage in the Company's Ship, but was prevail'd upon by me and by a French Gentleman, who was bound the same way as my self and from that time forward he was daily kinder and kinder to me. On the 20th of January he gave a farewel Treat, at which were all the Officers of the Company. After several Healths, he drank to the Captain of the Ship, charging and intreating him to take care and make very much of me, as he would do by him if he were aboard. I thank'd him for so extraordinary a favour.

2. On the 21st in the Morning the Director-General sent for me. I was surpriz'd and went to him; the Captain of the Ship, and the

____________________
1
Carré (19), in Surat at the time, witnessed the departure of Navarrete's ship. He returned to France by land. Had Navarrete gone by land, or Carré by sea, these two gossips would have had much to say of each other. By another coincidence Carré returned to report to Colbert on Caron's behalf; and Navarrete also was supposed to report to him on behalf of Bishop Pallu, see pp. 428-9 below.
2
Caron, though a 'fino Herege', had had a Catholic wife, a converted Japanese. For other references to him and his news from Japan, see T 441; C 35, 474, 639-40. For his life, see Boxer edition of his True Description, xv-cxxix.

-338-

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