The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2

By Domingo Fernández Navarrete; J. S. Cummins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXVIII
MY STAY IN LISBON, AND JOURNEY TO ROME

1. I am satisfied I have forgot several Particulars among such variety of Accidents I have seen in the course of so many Years. I omitted one remarkable thing concerning the Island Ceylon, which is a vast high Mountain, the Portugueses and others call Pico de Adan, or Adam's Clift; it ends above in a Point sharp to appearance, whither they say our first Parent ascended; this is grounded on that Opinion which maintains that Paradise is there. The Beauty, Fruitfulness, and Pleasantness of the Place makes for it. They have less to show for it who place it in the Island Zibu, or that of the Name of Jesus, which is one of the Philippine Islands; and I wonder some Authors have not placed it in China, for what was written of Paradise is much more easily to be realiz'd there.

2. I writ nothing concerning Cambaya, a Kingdom subject to the Mogol, because I came not into it. The Agate-stone is found there, and there is so much of it, so cheap, and so curiously wrought, sold at Suratte, that it is wonderful to behold.

3. I reach'd Europe, after almost fifteen months sailing from China. I gave a larger turn about the World than Magellan, for he was neither at Coromandel, Suratte, nor Madagascar; he return'd not to Europe as I have done, God be prais'd. I have been in all four parts of the World, for Madagascar, St Helena, and Ascension, are parts of Africk. I have gone through such diversity of Climates, and tasted such variety of Water, Fruit, and other Food, that I believe few men can match me. It appears what Seas I have sailed, and now, lastly, going to Rome, and returning, I have travers'd the Mediterranean. One said, that the greatest Miracle God had wrought in small matters was the variety of

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