The Travels and Controversies of Friar Domingo Navarrete, 1618-1686 - Vol. 2

By Domingo Fernández Navarrete; J. S. Cummins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXI
SOME THINGS ADDED RELATING TO WHAT HAS BEEN ALREADY WRIT

1. After putting an end to my Travels, I have remembred some Passages that will suffice to make up another Chapter; and I doubt not but if I would give my self time to reflect upon what I have seen, I might find matter to dilate even further upon. 〈Since because it is China that all my thoughts are bent upon, I cannot chuse but return to it, tho' at present it shall be very briefly. [ T442]〉

2. I spoke something of the Civility, Modesty, and good Behaviour of the Chinese Soldiery; and considering the Experience I had of it, I might well have enlarg'd upon the Subject. Methinks the Chineses observe what the Emperor Aurelianus writ to one of his Lieutenants: 'Friend, says he, if you would be a good Commander, and desire to live, keep your Soldiers within bounds: I will not have the Country-man complain, that a Chicken or a Bunch of Grapes is forcibly taken from him; I will call them to account for a Grain of Salt, or drop of Oil, they have unjustly made use of. I will have my Soldiers grow rich with the Spoils of their Enemies, not with the Tears and Sweat of my Subjects. I will have them wear their Riches on their Backs, not lavish them in Taverns; I will have them chaste in their Quarters, and no Complaints come against them.' St Lewis King of France could not have given better Instructions to those that serv'd in his Armies. Marcus Scaurus writes, that he saw numbers of Soldiers lying under a great Tree loaded with Fruit, and none of them stretch'd out his hand to gather an Apple. Nor will that be thought strange which Lampridius writes of Alexander Severus, that the Soldiers march'd to the Persian War as if they had been Senators, and that the Country people lov'd them as if they had

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