The Inside Story of the Peace Conference

By E. J. Dillon | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

IT is almost superfluous to say that this book does not claim to be a history, however summary, of the Peace Conference, seeing that such a work was made sheer impossible now and forever by the chief delegates themselves when they decided to dispense with records of their conversations and debates. It is only a sketch -- a sketch of the problems which the war created or rendered pressing -- of the conditions under which they cropped up; of the simplicist ways in which they were conceived by the distinguished politicians who volunteered to solve them; of the delegates' natural limitations and electioneering commitments and of the secret influences by which they were swayed; of the peoples' needs and expectations; of the unwonted procedure adopted by the Conference and of the fateful consequences of its decisions to the world.

In dealing with all those matters I aimed at impartiality, which is an unattainable ideal, but I trust that sincerity and detachment have brought me reasonably close to it. Having no pet theories of my own to champion, my principal standard of judgment is derived from the law of causality and the rules of historical criticism.

The fatal tactical mistake chargeable to the Conference lay in its making the charter of the League of Nations and the treaty of peace with the Central Powers interdependent. For the maxims that underlie the former are irreconcilable with those that should determine the latter, and the efforts to combine them must, among other un-

-ix-

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The Inside Story of the Peace Conference
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • I - THE CITY OF THE CONFERENCE 1
  • II - SIGNS OF THE TIMES 45
  • III - THE DELEGATES 58
  • IV - CENSORSHIP AND SECRECY 117
  • V - AIMS AND METHODS 136
  • VI - THE LESSER STATES 184
  • VII - POLAND'S OUTLOOK IN THE FUTURE 264
  • VIII - ITALY 272
  • IX - JAPAN 322
  • X - ATTITUDE TOWARD RUSSIA 344
  • XI - BOLSHEVISM 376
  • XII - HOW BOLSHEVISM WAS FOSTERED 399
  • XIII - SIDELIGHTS ON THE TREATY 407
  • XIV - THE TREATY WITH GERMANY 455
  • XV - THE TREATY WITH BULGARIA 464
  • XVI - THE COVENANT AND MINORITIES 469
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