The Inside Story of the Peace Conference

By E. J. Dillon | Go to book overview

IV
CENSORSHIP AND SECRECY

NEVER was political veracity in Europe at a lower ebb than during the Peace Conference. The blinding dust of half-truths cunningly mixed with falsehood and deliberately scattered with a lavish hand, obscured the vision of the people, who were expected to adopt or acquiesce in the judgments of their rulers on the various questions that arose. Four and a half years of continuous and deliberate lying for victory had disembodied the spirit of veracity and good faith throughout the world of politics. Facts were treated as plastic and capable of being shaped after this fashion or that, according to the aim of the speaker or writer. Promises were made, not because the things promised were seen to be necessary or desirable, but merely in order to dispose the public favorably toward a policy or an expedient, or to create and maintain a certain frame of mind toward the enemies or the Allies. At elections and in parliamentary discourses, undertakings were given, some of which were known to be impossible of fulfilment. Thus the ministers in some of the Allied countries bound themselves to compel the Germans not only to pay full compensation for damage wantonly done, but also to defray the entire cost of the war.

The notion that the enemy would thus make good all losses was manifestly preposterous. In a century the debt could not be wiped out, even though the Teutonic

-117-

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The Inside Story of the Peace Conference
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • I - THE CITY OF THE CONFERENCE 1
  • II - SIGNS OF THE TIMES 45
  • III - THE DELEGATES 58
  • IV - CENSORSHIP AND SECRECY 117
  • V - AIMS AND METHODS 136
  • VI - THE LESSER STATES 184
  • VII - POLAND'S OUTLOOK IN THE FUTURE 264
  • VIII - ITALY 272
  • IX - JAPAN 322
  • X - ATTITUDE TOWARD RUSSIA 344
  • XI - BOLSHEVISM 376
  • XII - HOW BOLSHEVISM WAS FOSTERED 399
  • XIII - SIDELIGHTS ON THE TREATY 407
  • XIV - THE TREATY WITH GERMANY 455
  • XV - THE TREATY WITH BULGARIA 464
  • XVI - THE COVENANT AND MINORITIES 469
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