The Inside Story of the Peace Conference

By E. J. Dillon | Go to book overview

VI
THE LESSER STATES

BEFORE the Anglo-Saxon statesmen thus set themselves to rearrange the complex of interests, forces, policies, nationalities, rights, and claims which constituted the politico-social world of 1919, they were expected to deal with all the Allied and Associated nations, without favor or prejudice, as members of one family. This expectation was not fulfilled. It may not have been warranted. From the various discussions and decisions of which we have knowledge, a number of delegates drew the inference that France was destined for obvious reasons to occupy the leading position in continental Europe, under the protection of Anglo-Saxondom; and that a privileged status was to be conferred on the Jews in eastern Europe and in Palestine, while the other states were to be in the leading-strings of the Four. This view was not lightly expressed, however inadequately it may prove to have been then supported by facts. As to the desirability of forming this rude hierarchy of states, the principal plenipotentiaries were said to have been in general agreement, although responding to different motives. There was but one discordant voice -- that of France -- who was opposed to the various limitations set to Poland's aggrandizement, and also to the clause placing the Jews under the direct protection of the League of Nations, and investing them with privileges in which the races among whom they reside are not allowed to participate

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The Inside Story of the Peace Conference
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • I - THE CITY OF THE CONFERENCE 1
  • II - SIGNS OF THE TIMES 45
  • III - THE DELEGATES 58
  • IV - CENSORSHIP AND SECRECY 117
  • V - AIMS AND METHODS 136
  • VI - THE LESSER STATES 184
  • VII - POLAND'S OUTLOOK IN THE FUTURE 264
  • VIII - ITALY 272
  • IX - JAPAN 322
  • X - ATTITUDE TOWARD RUSSIA 344
  • XI - BOLSHEVISM 376
  • XII - HOW BOLSHEVISM WAS FOSTERED 399
  • XIII - SIDELIGHTS ON THE TREATY 407
  • XIV - THE TREATY WITH GERMANY 455
  • XV - THE TREATY WITH BULGARIA 464
  • XVI - THE COVENANT AND MINORITIES 469
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