The Inside Story of the Peace Conference

By E. J. Dillon | Go to book overview

XIII
SIDELIGHTS ON THE TREATY

FROM the opening of the Conference fundamental differences sprang up which split the delegates into two main parties, of which one was solicitous mainly about the resettlement of the world and its future mainstay, the League of Nations, and the other about the furtherance of national interests, which, it maintained, was equally indispensable to an enduring peace. The latter were ready to welcome the League on condition that it was utilized in the service of their national purposes, but not if it countered them. To bridge the chasm between the two was the task to which President Wilson courageously set his hand. Unluckily, by way of qualifying for the experiment, he receded from his own strong position, and having cut his moorings from one shove, failed to reach the other. His pristine idea was worthy of a world-leader; had, in fact, been entertained and advocated by some of the foremost spirits of modern times. He purposed bringing about conditions under which the pacific progress of the world might be safeguarded in a very large measure and for an indefinite time. But being very imperfectly acquainted with the concrete conditions of European and Asiatic peoples -- he had never before felt the pulsation of international life -- his ideas about the ways and means were hazy, and his calculations bore no real reference to the elements of the problem. Consequently, with what seemed a wide horizon and a generous

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The Inside Story of the Peace Conference
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • I - THE CITY OF THE CONFERENCE 1
  • II - SIGNS OF THE TIMES 45
  • III - THE DELEGATES 58
  • IV - CENSORSHIP AND SECRECY 117
  • V - AIMS AND METHODS 136
  • VI - THE LESSER STATES 184
  • VII - POLAND'S OUTLOOK IN THE FUTURE 264
  • VIII - ITALY 272
  • IX - JAPAN 322
  • X - ATTITUDE TOWARD RUSSIA 344
  • XI - BOLSHEVISM 376
  • XII - HOW BOLSHEVISM WAS FOSTERED 399
  • XIII - SIDELIGHTS ON THE TREATY 407
  • XIV - THE TREATY WITH GERMANY 455
  • XV - THE TREATY WITH BULGARIA 464
  • XVI - THE COVENANT AND MINORITIES 469
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