CHAPTER V.

THE book is well described in the preface to the first edition, as containing "a single thought," not a system of ideas. As time went on, the author was sometimes apt to forget this. But to forget it, is to miss much of the characteristic excellence of the work, and to neglect its essential limitations. As the exposition of a single idea, it stands contrasted with the contemporary efforts of the great systematisers. In them each branch of philosophy emancipates itself so as to be pursued, in "fancy-free" theory, merely for its own sake. Logic, ethics, and æsthetics, claim each a sphere of its own, and in the midst of one study we almost lose sight of another and of the common end. Schopenhauer proceeds other. wise. The four books into which he divides his work might, as he himself suggests, be severally said to contain the logic, metaphysics, æsthetics, and ethics of his system. But it is truer to say that they are four ways in which one truth reveals itself, in knowledge, in being, in art, and in conduct. Each aspect offers something the other was obliged to leave unsaid: but each is inwardly correspondent with the other, and expands only so far as that other permits. Each book is the complement of

-113-

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Life of Arthur Schopenhauer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • PREFATORY NOTE. 9
  • Chapter I 11
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter III 55
  • Chapter IV 89
  • Chapter V 113
  • Chapter VI 138
  • Chapter VII 165
  • INDEX. 213
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY. 219
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