The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche

By H. L. Mencken | Go to book overview

V
THE PHILOSOPHERE AND THE MAN

"MY brother," says Frau Förster-Nietzsche, in her biography, "was stockily and broadly built and was anything but thin. He had a rather dark, healthy, ruddy complexion. In all things he was tidy and orderly, in speech he was soft-spoken, and in general, he was inclined to be serene under all circumstances. All in all, he was the very antithesis of a nervous man.

"In the fall of 1888, he said of himself, in a reminiscent memorandum: 'My blood moves slowly. A doctor who treated me a long while for what was at first diagnosed as a nervous affection said: "No, your trouble cannot be in your nerves. I myself am much more nervous than you."' . . .

"My brother, both before and after his long illness seized him, was a believer in natural methods of healing. He took cold baths, rubbed down every morning and was quite faithful in continuing light, bed-room gymnastics."

At one time, she says, Nietzsche became a violent vegetarian and afflicted his friends with the ancient vegetarian horror of making a sarcophagus of one's stomach. It seems surprising that a man so quick to perceive errors,

-50-

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The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface to the Third Edition vii
  • Contents xiii
  • Nietzsche the Man 1
  • I - Boyhood and Youth 3
  • II - The Beginnings of the Philosopher 16
  • III - Blazing a New Path 27
  • IV - The Prophet of the Superman 40
  • V - The Philosopher and the Man 50
  • Nietzsche the Philosopher 61
  • I - Dionysus versus Apollo 63
  • II - The Origin of Morality 74
  • III - Beyond Good and Evil 88
  • IV - The Superman 100
  • V - Eternal Recurrence 117
  • VI - Christianity 126
  • VII - Truth 147
  • VIII - Civilization 162
  • IX - Women and Marriage 174
  • X - Government 192
  • XI - Crime and Punishment 208
  • XII - Education 216
  • XIII - Sundry Ideas 226
  • XIV - Nietzsche vs. Wagner 242
  • Nietzsche the Prophet 253
  • I - Nietzsche''s Origins 255
  • II - Nietzsche and His Critics 268
  • How to Study Nietzsche 290
  • Index 297
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