A Dictionary of the Characters in the Waverley Novels of Sir Walter Scott

By M. F. A. Husband | Go to book overview

TABLE OF THE WAVERLEY NOVELS
IN the following list the novels are taken according to their order in the 1829-33 Edition of 48 volumes. This edition, 'revised and corrected' by the Author, was the first published after Scott's public acknowledgment (in 1827) of his authorship. To the title of each novel is added in brackets the date of original publication. A few general notes are given regarding the period and localities with which each deals.
Vols. I, II, Waverley; or, 'Tis Sixty Years Since ( 1814):

The story opens in the spring of 1745; it includes the Jacobite rising, 'The Forty-five,' with the battle of Prestonpans, the triumphant occupation of Edinburgh, the march into England, and the return from Derby; it closes a few months after the decisive defeat which occurred at Culloden in April, 1746. Much of the action takes place in the Perthshire Highlands.

Vols. III, IV, Guy Mannering; or, The Astrologer ( 1815):

The opening scenes take place during the first five years of Harry Bertram's life, 1760-5. The main incidents occur sixteen years later, when Colonel Mannering and Vanbeest Brown return from India, occupying a few months of 1781-2. The scene is chiefly laid in Galloway, but incidents also occur in Westmoreland, Liddesdale, and Edinburgh.

Vols. V, VI, The Antiquary ( 1816):

The story begins one July near the end of the eighteenth century, and ends in August of the following year. Dealing mainly with the daily life of Monkbarns and his friends, it includes an account of a mistaken alarm of French invasion. With the exception of the opening scenes in Edinburgh and the Hawes Inn, Queensferry, the incidents take place in Forfarshire.

Vols. VII, VIII, Rob Roy (1817):

The story begins a few months before the outbreak of the Jacobite rising in 1715, and closes early in 1716, soon after the collapse of the rebellion. The rising is for the most part described only in its effect on the fortunes of the Osbaldistone family, but indications of the

-ix-

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A Dictionary of the Characters in the Waverley Novels of Sir Walter Scott
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • INTRODUCTORY NOTE vii
  • TABLE OF THE WAVERLEY NOVELS ix
  • Dictionary Of The Waverley Novels 1
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