The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy: And Other Essays in Contemporary Thought

By John Dewey | Go to book overview

THE EXPERIMENTAL THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE.1

IT should be possible to discern and describe a knowing as one identifies any object, concern, or event. It must have its own marks; it must offer characteristic features -- as much so as a thunder-storm, the constitution of a State, or a leopard. In the search for this affair, we are first of all desirous for something which is for itself, contemporaneously with its occurrence, a cognition, not something called knowledge by another and from without -- whether this other be logician, psychologist, or epistemologist. The "knowledge" may turn out false, and hence no knowledge; but this is an after-affair; it may prove to be rich in fruitage of wisdom, but if this outcome be only wisdom after the event, it does not concern us. What we want is just something which takes itself as knowledge, rightly or wrongly.

____________________
1
Reprinted, with considerable change in the arrangement and in the matter of the latter portion, from Mind, Vol. XV., N.S., July, 1906

-77-

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The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy: And Other Essays in Contemporary Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents *
  • The Influence of Darwinism On Philosophy 1
  • Nature and Its Good: A Conversation 20
  • Intelligence and Morals 46
  • The Experimental Theory Of Knowledge. 77
  • The Intellectualist Criterion For Truth 112
  • A Short Catechism Concerning Truth 154
  • Beliefs and Existences 169
  • Experience and Objective Idealism 198
  • The Postulate of Immediate Empiricism 226
  • "Consciousness" and Experience 242
  • The Significance of the Problem Of Knowledge 271
  • Index 305
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