Governor Dummer Academy History, 1763-1963

By John W. Ragle | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
Charles S. Ingham

In October, 1908, nine boarding students had been reported by Dr. Ingham to the Board. The total enrollment was twenty-two. By December, 1915, the enrollment, having risen to sixty-five, had nearly tripled. The October, 1917, issue of The Archon reported the boarding department full, with fifty boys living on campus. Hidden amidst the flamboyant phrasing of a subcommittee report to the Trustees in November, 1919 (the Board was at the time girding itself for a fund-raising drive of startling proportions), is the gratifying statement that the school ". . . is not only full but has a waiting list for the first time probably in the 156 years of its existence [sic]."

In 1908 the total amount spent for faculty salaries, including the Headmaster's, fell short of $5,000. For the year 1915-16, with the teaching staff increased from six to nine, it nearly reached $10,000. In the year 1925-1926, for a faculty of about the same size, Dr. Ingham was authorized to spend $24,000. He himself was earning more than the total amount of the payroll for 1908.

Late in 1910, as we have seen, the Academy tottered on the brink of dissolution. Only a last-ditch fund drive, which barely met the crisis, prevented the closing of the school. The Treasurer's Report for 1914-1915 reflects the comforting fact that the operation of the school broke about even for the year. In September, 1917, Treasurer Frederick P. Cabot was warmly thanked by the Trustees for his report, which was slightly "in the black" for the preceding year. The financial condition of the Academy continued to grow more secure until by June, 1926, the annual operations were showing a healthy margin of safety.

In February, 1922, Charles Somerby, member of the Class of 1913, thereafter a most loyal supporter of Dr. Ingham and the school, and at the time a reporter for the Haverhill Evening Gazette, received a letter from Trustee Roland H. Sherman (formerly a student under Master Perkins). In it Mr. Sherman foresaw a happy future for the Academy and described several hoped-for improvements in the plant and the program. Reporting that "for the last few years we have been obliged to turn away from twenty to thirty boys each year for lack of accommodations," he cited the

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Governor Dummer Academy History, 1763-1963
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword V
  • Preface VII
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS IX
  • List of Illustrations XI
  • PROLOGUE XIII
  • Chapter I - The Dummer Family in America 3
  • Chapter II - Master Moody 13
  • Chapter III - Isaac Smith 28
  • Chapter IV - Allen, Abbot, and Adams 39
  • Chapter V - Nehemiah Cleaveland 47
  • Chapter VI - F. A. Adams, Durant, and Chute 58
  • Chapter VII - Henshaw, Albee, John S. Parsons, and Foster 66
  • Chapter VIII - Stanton, Ebenezer Greenleaf Parsons, and Perkins 73
  • Chapter IX - Perley Leonard Horne 84
  • Chapter X - Sprague, Ryther, and Ingham 91
  • Chapter XI - Charles S. Ingham 107
  • Chapter XII - Edward W. Eames 119
  • Chapter XIII - Edward W. Eames 138
  • Chapter XIV - Edward W. Eames 151
  • EPILOGUE 168
  • THE APPENDIX 173
  • Index 178
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