The Search for Being: Essays from Kierkegaard to Sarte on the Problem of Existence

By Jean T. Wilde; William Kimmel | Go to book overview

FRIEDRICH WILHELM JOSEPH VON SCHELLING (1775-1854)

FRIEDRICH WILHELM JOSEPH VON SCHELLINGwas educated at Tübingen in theology, philology and philosophy. He went to Leipzig in 1796 and studied mathematics, natural science and medicine for two years and at Jena attended lectures by Fichte whose colleague he became when, through the good offices of Goethe, he received a call to lecture as that famous university. Here his circle of friends included Fichte, Goethe, Schiller, August Wilhelm Schlegel, and the latter's wife Caroline whom he later married. He became editor of the Zeitschrift für spekulative Physik in 1800, professor in Würzburg in 1803 and 1804, member and subsequently secretary of the Akademie der Wissenschaften in Munich, lecturer in Erlangen from 1820 to 1826, and from 1827 professor in Munich at the newly established university. In 1841 he was called by King Frederick William IV to Berlin where he was "to fight against the dragon seed of Hegelian pantheism." He became a member of the Berlin Akademie der Wissenschaften and lectured at the university on mythology and revelation. The hoped for great success was, however, not forthcoming, due in large part to a lawsuit waged and lost by Schelling against his most violent opponent, the theologian H. E. G. Paulus, for unauthorized publication of his lectures. Unwilling to combat all the ill feeling and unpleasantness, Schelling resigned his post and lived in seclusion until his death at a spa in Switzerland.

It was characteristic of Schelling's thought to move continually to new points of view. His philosophy bears evidence of the in-

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The Search for Being: Essays from Kierkegaard to Sarte on the Problem of Existence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • Acknowledgments 6
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS 7
  • Introduction 9
  • PART I. THE EXISTENTIAL DEMAND OF BEING 27
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling (1775-1854) 29
  • SØren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) 49
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900). 97
  • PART II. THE SELF-CREATING PRINCIPLE OF BEING 135
  • FÉlix Ravaisson-Mollien (1813-1900) 137
  • Jules Lachelier (1832-1918) 151
  • Henri Bergson (1859-1941) 175
  • Jean-Paul Sartre (1905- ) 217
  • PART III. THE HISTORICAL MODES OF BEING 281
  • Wilhelm Dilthey (1833-1911) 283
  • Georg Simmel (1838-1918) 313
  • Max Scheler (1874-1928) 345
  • Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) 377
  • PART IV. THE ENCOUNTER OF BEINGS WITH BEING 415
  • Gabriel Marcel (1889- ) 417
  • Karl Jaspers (1833- ) 451
  • Martin Heidegger (1889- ) 491
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 521
  • Index 535
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