Abraham Lincoln, Constitutionalism, and Equal Rights in the Civil War Era

By Herman Belz | Go to book overview

4
Protection of Personal Liberty in Republican Emancipation Legislation

THE MOTIVATION OF REPUBLICAN EMANCIPATION POLICY in 1862 has been a perennial imponderable of Civil War historiography. In 1948 Richard Hofstadter gave pointed expression to what has come to be known as the revisionist view of the matter in stating that Lincoln adopted emancipation only after all other policies failed, that he resorted to it in an unhappy frame of mind, and that the Emancipation Proclamation "had all the moral grandeur of a bill of lading." "It contained no indictment of slavery," Hofstadter wrote, "but simply based emancipation on 'military necessity.'"1 In 1963, believing that a good point had been carried too far, Mark M. Krug contended that Lincoln undertook emancipation not just for military reasons but also to right a moral wrong. Krug advanced this conclusion as a reasonable inference based on Lincoln's expressions of hatred for slavery and on the judgment of contemporaries that moral conviction sustained the emancipation edict.2 Similarly, Harry V. Jaffa, viewing Lincoln's career as a consistent whole, the rationale of which was to remove the curse of slavery from the American republic and from both the black and the white races, concluded in 1965 that Lincoln deserved to be regarded, as he traditionally had been, as the great emancipator.3

Something of a fusion of the revisionist and traditionalist interpre-

____________________
An earlier version of this chapter appeared in The Journal of Southern History, 42, No. 3 ( August 1976), 385-400.
1
Richard Hofstadter, The American Political Tradition and the Men Who Made It ( New York: Vintage, 1954), p. 132.
2
Mark M. Krug, "The Republican Party and the Emancipation Proclamation," Journal of Negro History, 48 ( April 1963), 98-114.
3
Harry V. Jaffa, Equality and Liberty: Theory and Practice in American Politics ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1965), pp. 140-68.

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abraham Lincoln, Constitutionalism, and Equal Rights in the Civil War Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.