Abraham Lincoln, Constitutionalism, and Equal Rights in the Civil War Era

By Herman Belz | Go to book overview

Conclusion: Legitimacy, Consent, and Equality in the Reconstruction Settlement

AMERICANS WENT TO WAR in 1861 to resolve fundamental ambiguities in the nature of the Union and the status of slavery as an institution in republican society. In the 1840s, in the context of territorial expansion that was bound to alter the relative political power of South and North as constituent sections of the country, slavery and the nature of the Union became inextricably related. Animated by mutual apprehension at the revolutionary threat which each section believed the other posed to its social order, a pattern of politics took shape that by the late 1850s demanded resolution of these issues. The question was whether the ambiguities at the root of the conflict would be resolved through political means, including constitutional amendment, legislative policy, and judicial decision, or the alternative of war.

The Civil War initiated the process of clarifying the nature of republican liberty in the United States. Reconstruction completed it--at least to the satisfaction of the generation of Americans who fought the war. Reconstruction was intended to resolve the substantive issues over which the war was fought. First, was the Union a political association of sovereign states in the nature of a compact, or a union of individuals in the aggregate constituting a sovereign nation? A second issue, arising out of the policy of slave emancipation made necessary by the war, concerned the status and rights of the country's black population. Were blacks to be recognized as citizens and integrated into society on an equal basis with the white population, or would they be assigned a separate classification on the basis of racial identity? A third issue was the relationship between the federal government and the states with respect to the regulation of personal liberty and civil rights. Before the war a subject almost exclusively within the state police power, wartime emancipation interjected the federal government into this sphere of public policy. Would reconstruction policy recognize the authority of the states with respect to civil rights, or would it revolutionize the

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abraham Lincoln, Constitutionalism, and Equal Rights in the Civil War Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.