German Women in the Nineteenth Century: A Social History

By John C. Fout | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

One of the frequent complaints expressed in the essays that make up this book is that the male-dominated German historical profession has failed to write or show much interest in the history of German women. If this book was undertaken with any one intent in mind, it was to make a contribution to redressing that imbalance in German historiography. In turn, I can only hope that these essays will encourage others to join what is an ever-increasing number of scholars who are already publishing in the field. A second goal was to bring together a collection of essays that represented the best and most sophisticated work now being done on German women's history. I also wanted the collection to be crossdisciplinary and to bring together scholars from both sides of the Atlantic. In the case of the former, a number of disciplines are indeed included here (see "The Contributors" at the back of this book): history, political science, economic history, literature, and education. And there are scholars from the universities of Bielefeld, Cologne, Liverpool, and Perugia, as well as a number of American colleges and universities. (In this generation of disharmony in the relations between nations, scholars can set an example through the peaceful exchange of ideas between peoples.) Finally, with the cooperation and help of the contributors, I sought to organize this book in such a way as to make it interesting and informative to specialists and yet readable for an audience of undergraduates and general readers.

If I have succeeded in any of these goals, it is largely because of the many people who helped make this book possible and I would like to express my gratitude to them at this time. It is appropriate that I first acknowledge the contributors themselves, who, from the beginning to the end of the arduous process of getting this book off to press, have done everything possible to make my responsibility as editor less burdensome. All the contributors were prompt in turning in their essays -- some kind of record for such a big book -- and more importantly, all of them were supportive of the project and intent on its success. The spirit of cooperation and enterprise that prevails in the field of women's history should be a model for the behavior of the larger historical profession. I am especially

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