German Women in the Nineteenth Century: A Social History

By John C. Fout | Go to book overview

Prelude to Consciousness
Amalie Sieveking and the Female Association for the Care of the Poor and the Sick

CATHEMNE M. PRELINGER

A perennial task for the historian of women is the reassessment of preconditions for the development of feminism and the identification of circumstances under which women can function independently to initiate social change in their own behalf. Women's historians have increasingly rejected models of victimization and recognize women's responsibility in shaping their own lives. Occasionally what appears to the historian to be no more than cooperation in support of patriarchy is in fact the innovative pursuit of self-interest, autonomy, and power as women themselves perceive it within the possibilities of contemporary circumstances. 1 This essay examines the work of one such woman, Amalie Sieveking ( 1794-1859).

Sieveking was a member of the Hamburg patriciate, daughter and granddaughter of senators, niece of a syndic, and cousin of another syndic who was one of Hamburg's principal early-nineteenth-century diplomats. Because her outlook is and was uncongenial to feminists, her role as a liberator of women has been neglected, but, within the German context, she was a pioneer. She made philanthropic activity available to women at a time when, unlike the situation in England, organized Protestant charity was monopolized by men, and she did so not simply to improve the quality of charity but to improve the quality of women's lives. As she indicated in a speech before an audience in Bremen in 1841, nearly a decade after she had founded the Female Association for the Care of the Poor and the Sick (Weiblicher Verein für Armen-und Krankenpflege):

-118-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
German Women in the Nineteenth Century: A Social History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 439

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.