German Women in the Nineteenth Century: A Social History

By John C. Fout | Go to book overview

significantly different way. Regional trends in infant and child mortality reflected quite closely the degree to which the local agrarian regime determined the extent of female involvement in the agricultural work force. The process of agricultural change in the east in the decades following the reform legislation of 1807-21 had a markedly negative effect on the work role of peasant women, and contributed both directly and indirectly to the increasingly high rate of infant mortality in this region, particularly in comparison with the western provinces. Confirmation of this general hypothesis, that trends in regional infant and child mortality levels reflected the underlying impact of economic and specifically agricultural development on the nature of women's work, must be sought through a more systematic study of different peasant ecosystems. Attention must be focused at the local level on the different structures of production, labor requirements, and the relative level of technological development. 56 More importantly, research should be centered on specific peasant subgroups, such as smallholders and landless laborers, in order to examine the class-specific ramifications of changes in the structure of local agricultural production on women's work and the pattern of child care. 57 Indeed, existing studies on the organization of peasant society in Germany which pay particular attention to the nature and extent of women's work within both the family home and the local agrarian economy, 58 provide a useful analytical framework which historical ethnological studies will hopefully reinforce and extend. 59 Only on the basis of such an interdisciplinary approach will the historical interrelationship between agrarian change, women's work, child care, and infant mortality be more fully understood.


NOTES
1.
D. Langewiesche and K. Schönhoven, "Zur Lebensweise von Arbeitern in Deutschland im Zeitalter der Industrialisierung", in Arbeiter in Deutschland. Studien zur Lebensweise der Arbeiterschaft im Zeitalter der Industrialisierung, ed. by. D. Langewiesche and K. Schönhoven ( Paderborn, 1981), p. 22.
2.
I. Weber-Kellermann, Die Deutsche Familie ( Frankfurt, 1977), passim. Phillipe Ariés, L'Enfant et la vie familiale sous l'ancien régime ( Paris, 1960).
3.
Arthur E. Imhof, "Women, Family and Death: Excess Mortality of Women in four Communities in Nineteenth-Century Germany", in The German Family: Essays in the Social History of the Family in Nineteenth-and TwentiethCentury Germany, ed. by R. J. Evans and W. R. Lee ( London, 1981), p. 101.

-249-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
German Women in the Nineteenth Century: A Social History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 439

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.