Italian Baroque and Rococo Architecture

By John Varriano | Go to book overview

Glossary
Aedicule A window, door, or niche framed by two columns or
pilasters and topped by a pediment.
Apse A vaulted, semicircular, or polygonal end of a church or
chapel.
Arcuation Construction using arches and vaults (as opposed to posts
and lintels).
Atlantes Sculpted human figures that are used in place of columns.
Male figures are called atlantes or telamones; females,
caryatids.
Bay The spatial unit between windows, columns, pilasters,
etc., in a building or wall.
Caryatids Columnar supports sculpted as female figures. See atlantes.
Castello Castle or fortress.
Centralized plan A symmetrical ground plan such as a circle, octagon, or
Greek cross.
Centro The center of an Italian city.
Chancel The part of a church containing the principal altar which
is reserved for the clergy and choir.
Chiaroscuro The arrangement or treatment of light and dark in paint-
ing and architecture.
Choir The section of a church, usually the west part of the
chancel, where the choir sits.
Crossing The part of a church where the nave and transept inter-
sect in a cruciform plan.
Dome A vault, which in seventeenth-century architecture usually
consists of a drum, an attic, the vault proper, and a lantern.
Duomo The principal cathedral of an Italian city or town.
Elevation The vertical face, or plane, of a building.
Encased pedimentSee pediment.
Entablature The upper section of a columnar order, consisting of three
horizontal parts: the architrave, frieze, and cornice.
Fabbrica The office that supervised construction.
Giant order A classical order that extends through two or more stories.
Greek cross A cross with four arms of equal length.
Herm A decorative form that consists of a human half-figure
above and a pilaster below.

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Italian Baroque and Rococo Architecture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Precursors of the Roman Baroque: Vignola to Carlo Maderno 19
  • 3 - Francesco Borromini 45
  • 4 - Gianlorenzo Bernini 75
  • 5 - Pietro da Cortona 107
  • 6 - Other Aspects of the Roman Baroque 125
  • 7 - Rococoand Academic Classicism in Eighteenth-Century Rome 159
  • 8 - Northern Italy in the Seventeenth Century 183
  • 9 - Guarino Guarini 209
  • 10 - Northern Italy in the Eighteenth Century 229
  • 11 - Southern Italy 261
  • Glossary 309
  • Illustration Credits 313
  • Index 319
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