Pan-Africanism and East African integration

By Joseph S. Nye Jr. | Go to book overview

VIII
Pan-Africanism and African Integration

Not ideas, but material and ideal interests directly govern man's conduct. Yet very frequently the "world images" which have been created by "ideas" have, like switchmen, determined the tracks along which action has been pushed by the dynamic of interests.

Max Weber1

In Europe, integration as exemplified by the EEC is a response to two disastrous wars and the growth of a modern industrial economy. Africa has had no such disastrous wars and has largely primitive economies. Nonetheless, efforts at integration in Africa are more than imitation or grandiose dreams. African leaders are determined to industrialize their countries, though "the national boundaries are both too tight and not suitably drawn to provide the balanced markets and supplies to permit of purely national planning in industrialization . . ."2

We saw in Chapter V the difference between the potential for industrialization of Uganda compared to East Africa as a whole. Yet 70 per cent of the African states independent in 1964 had smaller populations than Uganda; only three ( Nigeria, Egypt, Ethiopia) compared in size with East Africa. In other words, a strong case can be made for integration in Africa--not, perhaps, on a basis of "the bigger the better," considering the problems of enlargement we discussed in Chapter I--but at least on a regional level.

-243-

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Pan-Africanism and East African integration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Maps xii
  • Tables xiii
  • Abbreviations xvi
  • Part One - PAN-AFRICANISM 1
  • I - Nationalism, Pan-Africanism, and Integration 3
  • II - Pan-Africanism in East Africa 29
  • Part Two - EAST AFRICAN INTEGRATION 57
  • III - Social Integration 59
  • IV - Political Integration 84
  • V - Economic Integration 130
  • Part Three - PAN-AFRICANISM AND DECISIONS 173
  • VI - The Failure to Federate in 1963 175
  • VII - The Rejection of Association With the European Economic Community 211
  • VIII - Pan-Africanism and African Integration 243
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 255
  • Index 299
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