The Son of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs; J. Allen St. John | Go to book overview

II

MR. HAROLD MOORE was a biliouscountenanced, studious young man. He took himself very seriously, and life, and his work, which latter was the tutoring of the young son of a British nobleman. He felt that his charge was not making the progress that his parents had a right to expect, and he was now conscientiously explaining this fact to the boy's mother.

"It's not that he isn't bright," he was saying; "if that were true I should have hopes of succeeding, for then I might bring to bear all my energies in overcoming his obtuseness; but the trouble is that he is exceptionally intelligent, and learns so quickly that I can find no fault in the matter of the preparation of his lessons. What concerns me, however, is the fact that he evidently takes no interest whatever in the subjects we are studying. He merely accomplishes each lesson as a task to be rid of as quickly as possible and I am sure that no lesson ever again enters his mind until the hours of study and recitation once more arrive. His sole interests seem to be feats of physical prowess and the reading of every thing that he can get hold of relative to savage beasts and the

-14-

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The Son of Tarzan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • The Son of Tarzan 1
  • II 14
  • III 28
  • IV 42
  • V 56
  • VII 87
  • VIII 102
  • IX 117
  • X 133
  • XI 147
  • XII 162
  • XIII 177
  • XIV 192
  • XV 206
  • XVI 220
  • XVII 235
  • XVIII 249
  • XIX 267
  • XX 279
  • XXI 294
  • XXII 306
  • XXIII 322
  • XXIV 338
  • XXV 351
  • XXVI 367
  • XXVII 382
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