The Son of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs; J. Allen St. John | Go to book overview

V

CAPTAIN ARMAND JACOT of the Foreign Legion sat upon an outspread saddle blanket at the foot of a stunted palm tree. His broad shoulders and his close-cropped head rested in luxurious ease against the rough bole of the palm. His long legs were stretched straight before him overlapping the meager blanket, his spurs buried in the sandy soil of the little desert oasis. The captain was taking his ease after a long day of weary riding across the shifting sands of the desert.

Lazily he puffed upon his cigarette and watched his orderly who was preparing his evening meal. Captain Armand Jacot was well satisfied with himself and the world. A little to his right rose the noisy activity of his troop of sun-tanned veterans, released for the time from the irksome trammels of discipline, relaxing tired muscles, laughing, joking, and smoking as they, too, prepared to eat after a twelve hour fast. Among them, silent and taciturn, squatted five white-robed Arabs, securely bound and under heavy guard.

It was the sight of these that filled Captain Armand Jacot with the pleasurable satisfaction of a

-56-

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The Son of Tarzan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • The Son of Tarzan 1
  • II 14
  • III 28
  • IV 42
  • V 56
  • VII 87
  • VIII 102
  • IX 117
  • X 133
  • XI 147
  • XII 162
  • XIII 177
  • XIV 192
  • XV 206
  • XVI 220
  • XVII 235
  • XVIII 249
  • XIX 267
  • XX 279
  • XXI 294
  • XXII 306
  • XXIII 322
  • XXIV 338
  • XXV 351
  • XXVI 367
  • XXVII 382
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