The Son of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs; J. Allen St. John | Go to book overview

XVI

O Meriem, in her new home, the days passed quickly. At first she was all anxiety to be off into the jungle searching for her Korak. Bwana, as she insisted upon calling her benefactor, dissuaded her from making the attempt at once by dispatching a head man with a party of blacks to Kovudoo's village with instructions to learn from the old savage how he came into possession of the white girl and as much of her antecedents as might be culled from the black chieftain. Bwana particularly charged his head men with the duty of questioning Kovudoo relative to the strange character whom the girl called Korak, and of searching for the ape-man if he found the slightest evidence upon which to ground a belief in the existence of such an individual. Bwana was more than fully convinced that Korak was a creature of the girl's disordered imagination. He believed that the terrors and hardships she had undergone during captivity among the blacks and her frightful experience with the two Swedes had unbalanced her mind but as the days passed and he became better acquainted with her and able to observe her under the ordinary conditions

-220-

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The Son of Tarzan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • The Son of Tarzan 1
  • II 14
  • III 28
  • IV 42
  • V 56
  • VII 87
  • VIII 102
  • IX 117
  • X 133
  • XI 147
  • XII 162
  • XIII 177
  • XIV 192
  • XV 206
  • XVI 220
  • XVII 235
  • XVIII 249
  • XIX 267
  • XX 279
  • XXI 294
  • XXII 306
  • XXIII 322
  • XXIV 338
  • XXV 351
  • XXVI 367
  • XXVII 382
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