Shakespeare's Labored Art: Stir, Work, and the Late Plays

By Maurice Hunt | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Elliot Krieger, A Marxist Study of Shakespeare's Comedies ( London: Macmillan, 1979) 54-64, 68; 89-96; 131-33, 140-42, 147-53. Also see Paul N. Siegel , Shakespeare's English and Roman History Plays: A Marxist Approach ( Rutherford, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 1986) 25.
2
Russell Fraser, Young Shakespeare ( New York: Columbia UP, 1988) 38-39.
3
Bert O. States, in "Hamlet" and the Concept of Character ( Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins UP, 1992), demonstrates that the speech about the "fat weed" and "Lethe wharf" is a "perfect description of the phlegmatic [slothful] condition" (75-76).
4
For an alternative reading of labor in Hamlet, one that stresses the work of the scriptive hand, see Jonathan Goldberg, "Hamlet's Hand," Shakespeare Quarterly 39 ( 1988): 307-27.
5
Lynda L. Boose, "Othello's Handkerchief: 'The Recognizance and Pledge of Love,'" English Literary Renaissance 5 ( 1975): 360-74.
6
Cf. Rosalie L Colie, "Reason and Need: King Lear and the 'Crisis' of the Aristocracy," Some Facets of "King Lear": Essays in Prismatic Criticism, ed. Rosalie L. Colie and F. T. Flahiff ( Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1974) 185-219, esp. 199-202; and Raman Selden, "King Lear and True Need," Shakespeare Studies 19 ( 1987): 143-69, esp. 146, 157-58.
7
William C. Carroll, in "'The Base Shall Top Th'Legitimate': The Bedlam Beggar and the Role of Edgar in King Lear," Shakespeare Quarterly 38 ( 1987): 426-41, esp. 431-34, shows from contemporary accounts that Jacobeans generally regarded the bedlam beggar as the fictitious persona of a charlatan, who deserved whipping rather than charity.
8
Alexander Leggatt, "Macbeth and the Last Plays," Mirror Up to Shakespeare: Essays in Honour of G. R, Hibbard, ed. J. C. Gray ( Tor-onto: U of Toronto P, 1984) 189-207.
9
Evocative descriptions of opposed Roman and Egyptian values appear in Robert Ornstein, "The Ethic of the Imagination: Love and Art in Antony and Cleopatra," Later Shakespeare, ed. John Russell Brown and Bernard Harris, Stratford-upon-Avon Studies 8 ( London: Edward Arnold, 1966) 31-46, esp. 36-38; and in Julian Markels, The Pillar of the World. "Antony and Cleopatra" in Shakespeare's Development ( Columbus: Ohio State UP, 1968) 36-48.
10
This aversion receives indirect reinforcement in Antony's case from his close association throughout the play with his ancestor Hercules, noted

-63-

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Shakespeare's Labored Art: Stir, Work, and the Late Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 - Work and Shakespeare's Age 1
  • Notes 22
  • Chapter 2 - From Hamlet to Timon of Athens: Work in Shakespeare's Later Plays 27
  • Notes 63
  • Chapter 3 - Pericles 71
  • Notes 91
  • Chapter 4 - Cymbeline 95
  • Notes 130
  • Chapter 5 - The Winter's Tale 135
  • Notes 159
  • Chapter 6 - The Tempest 163
  • Notes 193
  • Chapter 7 - King Henry VIII 199
  • Notes 227
  • Chapter 8 - The Two Noble Kinsmen 231
  • Notes 255
  • Chapter 9 - Shakespeare's Labored Art 259
  • Notes 276
  • Works Cited 279
  • Index 305
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