Shakespeare's Labored Art: Stir, Work, and the Late Plays

By Maurice Hunt | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Leontes infamous "affection" speech has been analyzed by, among others, Harold C. Goddard, The Meaning of Shakespeare ( Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1951) 2:264-65; J. V. Cunningham, Woe or Wonder ( Denver: U of Denver P, 1951) 113-14; Hallett Smith, "Leonites' Affectio," Shakespeare Quarterly 14 ( 1963): 163-66; The Winter's Tale, ed. J. H. P. Pafford, Arden Shakespeare ( London: Methuen, 1965) 165-67; Jonathan Smith, "The Language of Leonites," Shakespeare Quarterly 19 ( 1968): 317-27, esp. 317-18; Marjorie Garber, Dream in Shakespeare: From Metaphor to Metamorphosis ( New Haven: Yale UP, 1974) 165-66; Carol Thomas Neely, "The Winter's Tale: The Triumph of Speech," Studies in English Literature 15 ( 1975): 321-38, esp. 324-27; and David Ward, "Affection, Intention, and Dreams in The Winter's Tale," Modern Language Review 82 ( 1987): 545-54.
2
Charles Frey has remarked that, "as king," Leonites "has perhaps some reason to become trapped in divine analogy, but as man, dependent upon woman in order to play his part in creation, he cannot be self-sufficient" ( Shakespeare's Vast Romance: A Study of "The Winter's Tale" [ Columbia: U of Missouri P, 1980] 131).
3
Ernest Schanzer, "The Structural Pattern of The Winter's Tale," Review of English Literature 5 ( 1964): 72-82, esp. 79; David Young, The Heart's Forest: A Study of Shakespeare's Pastoral Plays ( New Haven: Yale UP, 1972) 119, 125, 133-45.
4
On Time's literal figurative turning of his hourglass, see Frey142- 43.
5
Howard Felperin, in Shakespeare Romance ( Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1972), has characterized the birth labor of Time in this play: "Perdita and her fortunes will be 'brought forth' as an actress is brought forth onto the stage, but also as a child is brought forth into the world: 'By law and process of great nature' ( II. ii. 60)" (231).
6
The fullest explication of this idea is that of Soji Iwasaki, "Veritas Filia Temporis and Shakespeare," English Literary Renaissance 3 ( 1973): 249-63, esp. 261-63 (for The Winter's Tale). But also see Fritz Saxl, "Veritas Filia Temporis," Philosophy and History: Essays Presented to Ernst Cassirer, ed. Raymond Klibansky and H. J. Paton ( Oxford: Clarendon P, 1936) 197- 222; and Erwin Panofsky, Studies in Iconology ( New York: Oxford UP, 1939) 83-91.

-159-

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Shakespeare's Labored Art: Stir, Work, and the Late Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 - Work and Shakespeare's Age 1
  • Notes 22
  • Chapter 2 - From Hamlet to Timon of Athens: Work in Shakespeare's Later Plays 27
  • Notes 63
  • Chapter 3 - Pericles 71
  • Notes 91
  • Chapter 4 - Cymbeline 95
  • Notes 130
  • Chapter 5 - The Winter's Tale 135
  • Notes 159
  • Chapter 6 - The Tempest 163
  • Notes 193
  • Chapter 7 - King Henry VIII 199
  • Notes 227
  • Chapter 8 - The Two Noble Kinsmen 231
  • Notes 255
  • Chapter 9 - Shakespeare's Labored Art 259
  • Notes 276
  • Works Cited 279
  • Index 305
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