Julius Caesar: A Guide to the Play

By Jo McMurtry | Go to book overview

classical antiquity, Plutarch . . . offered Renaissance readers a model of male bonding that closely matched the ways in which men related to men in their own society. . . . Plutarch's heroes move in a world defined totally in terms of political bonds. In this intensely masculine world emotional ties are a function of political ties. 50

G. Wilson Knight, writing in the early 1930s before the flowering of many of today's critical complexities, sees the characters' various loves as "emotional, fiery, but not exactly sexual, not physically passionate; even Portia and Brutus love with a gentle companionship rather than any passion." 51 Antony's love for Caesar, as Knight sees it, is simpler and thus stronger than Brutus's more complex love for Caesar: "Brutus loves him [Caesar] as a man but believes in him only too powerfully as a hero, and thinks him therefore dangerous. To Antony, the two aspects are indistinguishable." 52 Cassius too enjoys a stronger love than Brutus can manage. In the quarrel scene between Brutus and Cassius (IV.iii), "Cassius is always in touch with realities--of love, of conspiracy, of war: Brutus is ever most at home with his ethical abstractions." 53 Brutus's tragedy, in short, is his inability to love, although he comes closest to affection for his young servant Lucius, "his truest love." 54


NOTES
1.
Terence Hawkes, "Shakespeare and the New Critical Approaches," in Stanley Wells, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare Studies ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986), pp. 287-302. Jonathan Dollimore, "Critical Developments: Cultural Materialism, Feminism and Gender Critique, and New Historicism," in Stanley Wells, ed., Shakespeare: A Bibliographical Guide ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990), pp. 405-428.
2.
Heather Dubrow, Riverside Shakespeare, 2d ed. ( Boston: Houghton, 1997), p. 40.
3.
It seems that Freud once dreamed that he played the part of Brutus. Norman Holland, Psychoanalysis and Shakespeare ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1964; repr. Octagon Books, 1976), p. 64. For this detail, Holland cites Freud "Dostoevsky and Parricide" ( 1928). Freud's most extensive Shakepearean commentary is made on Hamlet, although Holland points out (p. 63) that he sometimes misquoted the text.
4.
Holland, in ibid. (p. 212), discusses these ideas from Rank Das Inzest-Motiv in Dichtung und Sage ( 1912).
5.
Ernest Jones, Hamlet and Oedipus ( New York: Doubleday, 1949; repr. Norton, 1976), pp. 121-122. Jones developed this book from several essays on the same general ideas, the first published in 1910.
7.
Gordon Ross Smith, "Brutus, Virtue, and Will," SQ 10 ( 1959), 379.
9.
Among the works Holland mentions under Julius Caesar (pp. 212-214) are Samuel A. Tannenbaum , "Psychoanalytical Gleanings from Shakespeare," Psyche and Eros 1 ( 1920), 29-39, and Harold Feldman, "Unconscious Envy in Brutus," AI 9 ( 1959), 307-335.
10.
Edward T. Herbert, "Myth and Archetype in Julius Caesar," Psychoanalytical Review 57 ( 1970), 303. Herbert also mentions James Frazier The Golden Bough ( 1890), which deals extensively with primitive tribes and their kings, and which influenced Freud.

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Julius Caesar: A Guide to the Play
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Greenwood Guides to Shakespeare ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • ABBREVIATIONS OF CITED WORKS xi
  • 1 - Textual History 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - Contexts and Sources 11
  • Notes 26
  • 3 - Dramatic Structure 29
  • Notes 59
  • 4 - Themes 61
  • Notes 83
  • 5 - Critical Approaches 85
  • Notes 96
  • 6 - The Play in Performance 99
  • Notes 128
  • SELECTED ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 133
  • Index 141
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 145

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.