CHAPTER XXX

I MET men at every turn who owned from one thousand to thirty thousand "feet" in undeveloped silver-mines, every single foot of which they believed would shortly be worth from fifty to a thousand dollars--and as often as any other way they were men who had not twenty-five dollars in the world. Every man you met had his new mine to boast of, and his "specimens" ready; and if the opportunity offered, he would infallibly back you into a corner and offer as a favor to you, not to him, to part with just a few feet in the "Golden Age," or the "Sarah Jane," or some other unknown stack of croppings, for money enough to get a "Square meal" with, as the phrase went. And you were never to reveal that he had made you the offer at such a ruinous price, for it was only out of friendship for you that he was willing to make the sacrifice. Then he would fish a piece of rock out of his pocket, and after looking mysteriously around as if he feared he might be waylaid and robbed if caught with such wealth in his possession, he would dab the rock against his tongue, clap an eyeglass to it, and exclaim:

"Look at that! Right there in that red dirt! See it? See the specks of gold? And the streak of

-207-

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Roughing It - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • PREFATORY *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 4
  • Chapter III 10
  • Chapter IV 19
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 37
  • Chapter VII 43
  • Chapter VIII 52
  • Chapter IX 57
  • Chapter X 63
  • Chapter XI 73
  • Chapter XII 81
  • Chapter XIII 93
  • Chapter XIV 98
  • Chapter XV 102
  • Chapter XVI 110
  • Chapter XVII 120
  • Chapter XVIII 126
  • Chapter XIX 131
  • Chapter XX 136
  • Chapter XXI 144
  • Chapter XXII 155
  • Chapter XXIII 161
  • Chapter XXIV 168
  • Chapter XXV 175
  • Chapter XXVI 183
  • Chapter XXVII 189
  • Chapter XXVIII 194
  • Chapter XXIX 201
  • Chapter XXX 207
  • Chapter XXXI 213
  • Chapter XXXII 224
  • Chapter XXXIII 230
  • Chapter XXXIV 234
  • Chapter XXXV 241
  • Chapter XXXVI 245
  • Chapter XXXVII 252
  • Chapter XXXVIII 259
  • Chapter Xxxix 264
  • Chapter XL 271
  • Chapter XLI 280
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