The Spanish Settlements within the Present Limits of the United States Florida, 1562-1574

By Woodbury Lowery | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
EXPEDITIONS OF PARDO AND BOYANO -- RETURN OF AVILÉS TO SPAIN

IN compliance with the orders of Avilés, Juan Pardo left Santa Elena November 1, 1566, with a party of twenty-five soldiers "to discover and conquer the interior country from there to Mexico!"1 The expedition was quite devoid of incident. He appears to have traversed the cypress lands in a north-easterly direction, and to have struck the Cambahee at a village called Guiomae, forty leagues distant from Santa Elena, where he ordered the construction of a log house for a Spanish outpost. From thence he turned west until he reached the Savannah River at Cufitatchiqui, which De Soto had visited twenty-five years before him. A few days later he was at another village called Ysa on a large river, possibly one of the northern branches of the Broad, and two days beyond he visited Juada, a village situated on a stream at the foot of the Alleghanies.

The season was far advanced, and there was so much snow on the mountains that he could not proceed. He remained fifteen days at Juada, where he built a block-

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1
"Relación del viaje y reconocimiento que hizo del interior de la. Florida en 1566 el Capitan Juan Pardo, por orden del Adelantado Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, escrita por el soldado Francisco Martinez." Ruidíaz, La Florida, tomo ii., p. 477. And see Appendix W, The Date of Pardo's First Expedition.

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