Behind the Scenes with Edwin Booth

By Katherine Molony Goodale | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXIV
THE PLANS FOR THE PLAYERS

MR. Booth lingered over his supper the night we crossed the Rockies. Why hurry? The next town did not occur until tomorrow. The air outside was nippy. And then -- the moon rose! Nature composed an impromptu to challenge the Golden Gate. We said the beauty outside the car windows made our blood run cold, it was so unearthly. But chills gave way to thrills, for here I was on top of the Rocky Mountains; snug in a private car; eating a luscious supper, and across the table sat Edwin Booth! On such a night he could not fail to think aloud -- nor did he, for he told us the story of the club he was founding to honor his own profession. The beginning was frothy enough. He asked us to trace the lady in the moon. He scorned the poor old man up there. Even as he jested, I could not but again notice the entire absence of all flirtatiousness in Mr. Booth's manner and threw myself some invisible bouquets that my own manner was ditto. The car was whisking along a trestle that bridged exquisite, shimmering water, and we wondered that so high in the mountains there should be so large a lake. It reached as far as we could see from the windows on either side. I thought the scene perfect, but there is a contrary streak in me, so I bewailed the coldness of that clear-cut circle of light.

-253-

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