Behind the Scenes with Edwin Booth

By Katherine Molony Goodale | Go to book overview
INDEX
Abbe, Charles, plays Osric, 10; and Fool ( King Lear), 13; in Saginaw, 36
Academy of Music ( New York), rehearsals of Booth company, 7-15
Adonis,74
Ahrendt, Carl, rôles, 13; misunderstands Miss Molony's scene with Booth, 31
Albany, 86
Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, talked Booth into doing Richard III, 57; an Egyptian episode, 120, 121
Aldrich, Mrs. T. B., experience with visiting Frenchmen, 119, 120
American Opera Management, lends Academy of Music stage for Booth rehearsals, 8, 9
Amo, see Vaders, Emma
Anderson, Mary, 193, 196
' Arabian Nights,' 186
Austin, Tex., 137, 139
Australia, 305
Back-door man, 166
Baker, Mrs. A. F. (Mama), of Booth's Company. 13; rôles, 14; makes one of group. 18; excursion to Minnehaha Falls, 45; loses Regan for one performance, 100-03; guest in ' David Garrick,' 105; in San Francisco, 164; grandmother type, 188; guest of honor, 228-32; centre of stage at Denver Club, 264, 265; tale of Henry Irving, 276; left behind in New York, 285-87
Baldwin Hotel, 164, 182, 189
Baldwin Theatre, 164, 166, 169, 174, 192, 209
Baltimore, 94, 95, 97, 98, 106, 123
Barrett, Lawrence, production of Hernani, 3; management association with Booth, 4; writes Miss Molony's mother of her Booth engagement, 5; tells Miss Molony to sign Booth contract, 8; taking second place to Booth, 7, 8; introduces Miss Molony to Booth, 9; at rehearsals, 14, 15; final advice to Miss Molony, 16, 17; his dream of Perfect Theatre, 17; methods in theatre contrasted with Booth's, 19; Macbeth dropped from his repertoire, 25; his version of Hamlet compared with Booth's, 30; incident of Yorick's Love, 31, 32; his vigorous myth, 2; changes 'business' for Tower scene in Richard III, 58; characterizes Shakespeare as actor's Bible, 63; pooh-poohs omen of broken mirror, 70; formed Miss Molony's theatre sense, 82, his insistence on apologies, 91; sends for Miss Molony, 91, 92; his interest in his company, 92; relates something of Booth's boyhood, 102; danced with Miss Molony's mother in New Orleans, 105; where death and insanity should be studied, 106; Miss Molony's promise not to smoke, 143; instigates a job of diplomacy for her, 154 et seq.; confident she will persuade Booth to wear wig in Hamlet, 162; knew all about Minnie Maddern, 193; delight in her, 194; of his experience, 220; arranges holiday week for Booth, 222; might be conservative next season, 259; conference with Booth on Booth-Barrett Company, 272; urges theatre project, 272, 273; his health undermined, 273; assurance to Miss Molony, 274; aware of reason Booth changed bill to Richelieu, 236; New York engagement of Booth-Barrett combination, 299; receives Miss Molony, 300, 301; his walks with Booth during their season, 306, 307
Barron, Charles, rôles, 13; easy as the Ghost, 30; plays Iago to Booth's Othello, 209; at home in part, 211; not as stirring as Booth, 214; leaves company in New York, 285
Barrymore, Maurice, 299
Barton, Harry C., of Booth's company, 13; rôles, 14
Bateman, H. L., 276
Bateman, Isabel, 276
Bay City, Mich., 33, 34, 288
' Beggars on Horseback,' 267, 268, 269, 270, 271
Berlin, Germany, 132
Betterton, Thomas, 63
Bonaparte, see Napoleon
Booth, Edwin, contract with, 3; management association with Barrett, 4; his art, 5; rehearsals at Academy of Music, New York, 7-15; introduced to Miss Molony, 9; directs Richelieu rehearsal, 9, 10; changes Osric from Miss Molony to Charles Abbe, 10; first rehearsal, 11; to be chief attraction in Barrett's Perfect Theatre, 17; on way to Buffalo, 18; methods in theatre, 19, 20; enters by stage door, 20; inspects Miss Molony's make-up and costume as Marion de Lorme, 20, 21; his make-up as Richelieu, 21, 22; opening reception, 22; Curse of Rome scene, 23-25; illusion of height, 23-

-319-

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