Swedes in America, 1638-1938

By Adolph B. Benson; Naboth Hedin | Go to book overview

Colonists

AMANDUS JOHNSON

Dr. Johnson, born in Sweden, was educated at Gustavus Adolphus College, the University of Colorado, and the University of Pennsylvania, where he received the Ph.D. degree in 1908. He also holds honorary doctorates from his Alma Mater, Gustavus Adolphus College, from Augustana College, and the University of Gothenburg. For a number of years he taught Scandinavian languages at the University of Pennsylvania; for two years was director of an educational expedition to Africa; and, since his return, has devoted his time to the study of the Swedes in America. He is now President of the American Swedish Historical Foundation, Philadelphia. His work, The Swedish Settlements on the Delaware, in two volumes, is the authoritative publication on the subject, while The Swedes on the Delaware, 1638-1664 is a more popular version in one volume. He is also the author of Instruction for Johan Printz and has translated and edited Peter Lindeström's Geographia Americæ and The Journal and Biography of Nicholas Collin. Besides writing other books, he has contributed numerous articles and reviews to various newspapers and journals.

IN the early seventeenth century Holland established far- flung settlements in North and South America, and soon England founded colonies on the James River and at other places on the North American coast. Denmark likewise aspired to a share in the colonial enterprise, and sent an expedition to the Hudson Bay district in 1619, but nothing came of it. Somewhat later Sweden decided to join in the movement that was now becoming general.

The first impetus toward Swedish transatlantic trade and colonization came from Holland. Willem Usselinx, the great Dutch promoter of the seventeenth century, persuaded Gustavus Adolphus to found, in 1626, a commercial company called the South Sea Company, for trade and colonization in Asia and America. Shares in the corporation were bought by the King and the nobility, and even by the people at large. Many of the cities in the Kingdom also subscribed relatively large sums; an American trading company was considered a sure road to wealth. Capital was scarce in Sweden at this time, however, and the

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Swedes in America, 1638-1938
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Swedish American Tercentenary Association ix
  • Editors' Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Colonists 5
  • Colonial Landmarks 35
  • The Swedish Language in America 52
  • Bibliography 72
  • Farmers 75
  • Pioneers of the Northwest 92
  • Geographical Distribution 107
  • Swedish Place Names in America 123
  • Religion 126
  • Charities and Self-Help 140
  • Colleges 154
  • Bibliography 180
  • Newspapers 181
  • Writers in Swedish 191
  • Magazines 206
  • Authors 209
  • Journalists 219
  • Translations of Swedish LIterature 237
  • Four Representatives of the Intellect Arrhenius, Berzelius, LInné, and Swedenborg 253
  • The New Church 279
  • Professors 282
  • Public School Educators 300
  • Lawyers 315
  • Public Officials 321
  • Doctors 338
  • Gymnastics 357
  • Sports and Sportsmen 366
  • Inventors 382
  • Engineers 407
  • Architects and Builders 416
  • Composers 435
  • Opera Singers 453
  • The American Union of Swedish Singers 469
  • Moving Picture Actors 473
  • Stage and Radio Performers 482
  • Painters and Sculptors 488
  • Soldiers and Sailors 506
  • Aviation 532
  • Manufacturers 551
  • Businessmen Gustaf Sundelius 572
  • Imports and Importers VIctor O. Freeburg 584
  • Index 599
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