Swedes in America, 1638-1938

By Adolph B. Benson; Naboth Hedin | Go to book overview

Four Representatives of the Intellect Arrhenius, Berzelius, Linné, and Swedenborg

DAVID F. SWENSON

For biographical notes on the Author, see the chapter on "Professors."

IN a time which displays, in many quarters, a febrile intensification of the deep-seated human passion to dominate others, it is an observation that might be cooling to this passion, if any passion could be moderated by mere knowledge, that the nationals of the smaller civilized countries of the world apparently occupy as high a plane of intellectual and moral culture as do the citizens of states that exercise a world-wide dominion. The smaller countries have contributed their full quota to the intellectual and spiritual riches of the world. They do, indeed, share in the culture of their larger neighbors; and it is an edifying and inspiring thought that the higher goods of life, just in proportion as they really are higher, are communicable without diminution. They refuse to be stamped with a particular and exclusive ownership; the richer any man or nation is in them, the richer all others are also. The treasures of science and thought cannot be monopolized in the long run, either by a privileged caste, a favored nation, or a supposedly superior race.

The intellect of man is, when rightly used, a weapon of emancipation. As it liberates the human being from the dominance of the present moment, so it frees him from exclusive subjection to his local and contextual relativity. A man of science has, by virtue of his occupation, a certain universality impressed upon his nature. I remember a remark made by Svante Arrhenius, the Swedish cosmographer and Nobel Prize winner, upon the occasion of his last visit to America. It was at one of those public receptions where the privilege of clasping the hand, and addressing some banal remark to the guest of honor, is the reward of taking the trouble to be present. This particular questioner asked Arrhenius how he liked America. He replied a little coolly: "My friend, you see my kind of people are

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Swedes in America, 1638-1938
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Swedish American Tercentenary Association ix
  • Editors' Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Colonists 5
  • Colonial Landmarks 35
  • The Swedish Language in America 52
  • Bibliography 72
  • Farmers 75
  • Pioneers of the Northwest 92
  • Geographical Distribution 107
  • Swedish Place Names in America 123
  • Religion 126
  • Charities and Self-Help 140
  • Colleges 154
  • Bibliography 180
  • Newspapers 181
  • Writers in Swedish 191
  • Magazines 206
  • Authors 209
  • Journalists 219
  • Translations of Swedish LIterature 237
  • Four Representatives of the Intellect Arrhenius, Berzelius, LInné, and Swedenborg 253
  • The New Church 279
  • Professors 282
  • Public School Educators 300
  • Lawyers 315
  • Public Officials 321
  • Doctors 338
  • Gymnastics 357
  • Sports and Sportsmen 366
  • Inventors 382
  • Engineers 407
  • Architects and Builders 416
  • Composers 435
  • Opera Singers 453
  • The American Union of Swedish Singers 469
  • Moving Picture Actors 473
  • Stage and Radio Performers 482
  • Painters and Sculptors 488
  • Soldiers and Sailors 506
  • Aviation 532
  • Manufacturers 551
  • Businessmen Gustaf Sundelius 572
  • Imports and Importers VIctor O. Freeburg 584
  • Index 599
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