The Fall of Constantinople: Being the Story of the Fourth Crusade

By Edwin Pears | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV. FLIGHT OF THE EMPEROR ALEXIS AND RESTORATION OF ISAAC.-- REVOLUTION IN THE CITY.

THE most useful ally of the invaders was the spirit of indifference and discontent which reigned within the city. While this spirit paralysed the efforts of the defenders, there was probably also a small but active, although secret, party in favour of Isaac and of young Alexis. The latter had made many promises to his friends within the city, and had urged them to assist him.1

The dissatisfaction with the ruling Emperor was great, and was doubtless increased by this party. The enemy without had not asked for possession of the city. There was nothing said even about an occupation. All that was demanded was that a young prince, who undoubtedly had claims to the throne if his father were dead, should replace Alexis the Third. There was indeed a payment to be made, though it is doubtful whether the terms of the convention with Alexis were at this time known within the city, and even if they were the payment might perhaps be avoided, or at least levied on the provinces. At any rate, it was better to come to an arrangement with the enemy when his demands were so reasonable than to fight.2 Moreover, there was now a distinct threat that if an arrangement were not

Feeling within Constantinople.

____________________
1
Gunther, xiii.: 'Cives itaque magnificæ urbis, territi fuga regis sui, quem etiam plerique nec prius propter scelera perpetrata satis dilexerant, simulque per nuntios a juniori Alexio promissis ac precibus frequentibus attentati, nostris quoque, contra spem suam, comminantibus excidium urbis, nisi illum legitimum heredem regni in regem susciperent, patentibus portis, illum cum toto exercitu infra mœnia pacifice admiserunt.'
2
Nicetas says (p. 721) that the object of the assault was, ὡς ἢ τω + ̑ν κατὰ σκοπὸν ἐπιτευξόμενοι ἢ τούτων διαπεσόντες ἐς συμβάσεις βλέψοντες˙ ἀμϕότερα γὰρ ἡ ϕήμη διπταμένη λαμπρω + ̑ς ἐκώτιλλεν.

-308-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fall of Constantinople: Being the Story of the Fourth Crusade
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 418

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.